zIFBoards - Free Forum Hosting
Free Forums with no limits on posts or members.

Learn More · Register for Free
Welcome to Colorado Carnivorous Plant Society. We hope you enjoy your visit.


You're currently viewing our forum as a guest. This means you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use. If you join our community, you'll be able to access member-only sections, and use many member-only features such as customizing your profile, sending personal messages, and voting in polls. Registration is simple, fast, and completely free.


Join our community!


If you're already a member please log in to your account to access all of our features:

Name:   Password:

> Welcome to Colorado Carnivorous Plant Society!
This is The Colorado Carnivorous Plant Society. A forum dedicated to Carnivorous Plants! Please feel free to look around. If you have questions, feel free to come to the Guest Board and ask your question there. I hope you enjoy your time here at The Colorado Carnivorous Plant Society and I hope you'll come again soon! If you want to Register, click here. Thank you and good day. ^^
-Jeremiah and Levi-



> Welcome Back
Welcome to Colorado Carnivorous Plant Society! Welcome to Colorado Carnivorous Plant Society, Your number one stop for Carnivorous Plants!

View New Posts | Today's active topics
Username: 
Password: 

 

 Pygmy Sundew
Khoas
Posted: Apr 12 2009, 09:26 PM


Newbie


Group: Members
Posts: 26
Member No.: 423
Joined: 19-January 09



Below is two photo of pygmy sundew. Both species are growing outdoors, in water throughout summer and living only 40 cm apart.

user posted image

Drosera paleacae ssp paleacea in gemmea production

user posted image

Drosera sargetii Breaking dormancy
Top
Steve A
Posted: Apr 14 2009, 11:39 AM


Member
Group Icon

Group: Admin
Posts: 112
Member No.: 27
Joined: 15-October 04



Nice looking pygmies! I grow mine outside during the summer and they do quite well. I bring them back in in the fall when the temps start dropping below 40F at night. They can take colder temps but I don't want to push my luck and find them under 3" of snow some morning.
Top
Khoas
Posted: Apr 15 2009, 12:18 AM


Newbie


Group: Members
Posts: 26
Member No.: 423
Joined: 19-January 09



Snow?? What that?
Top
Steve A
Posted: Apr 15 2009, 03:09 PM


Member
Group Icon

Group: Admin
Posts: 112
Member No.: 27
Joined: 15-October 04



It's this cold white stuff the Canadians keep sending us cuzz they don't want it either. First time I saw it on my scorpioides there was about two inches of it and I figured the plants were goners so I left them on the porch rail until I until lunch when I'd have more time to morn their loss. I got home, the sun was out, the temp was in the low 40's and the plants weren't any worse for the snow. Couldn't say the same for my nerves though.
Top
nicholas
Posted: Apr 15 2009, 10:14 PM


special person


Group: Members
Posts: 542
Member No.: 23
Joined: 26-September 04



What is the life span of most pygmies?


--------------------
Nicholas Johnson
CODE
happy.gif
Top
Khoas
Posted: Apr 16 2009, 12:42 AM


Newbie


Group: Members
Posts: 26
Member No.: 423
Joined: 19-January 09



Steve A - Well you found out that pygmies can handle snow. Very few pygmies in the wild would encounter snow. Bushfire yes but not snow.

Nicholas - At least 5 years in cultivation, longer in wild. Many people treat them as an annual, using the gemmae to replace the plants.
Top
nicholas
Posted: Jun 29 2009, 12:44 AM


special person


Group: Members
Posts: 542
Member No.: 23
Joined: 26-September 04



Is there any way to ensure they last that long? I tried the ones pictured in the top photo and they pretty much only lasted a year. I had success sprouting the gemmae, but then they were overcome by an algae or so it seemed. I would have brushed it off, but I didn't want to hurt the seedlings.


--------------------
Nicholas Johnson
CODE
happy.gif
Top
Khoas
Posted: Jun 29 2009, 06:04 AM


Newbie


Group: Members
Posts: 26
Member No.: 423
Joined: 19-January 09



D. paleacea ssp paleacea can be tricky to grow. It took three years for me to get a colony going. It like a 60% sand to peat mix. I find that larger pots are better, the soil temperature is more even and the there is room for the long roots. Also avoid summer dormancy, if possible, by maintaining an even water level of about 2 - 3cm through summer. Also grow them in full sun.
Top
nicholas
Posted: Jul 22 2009, 03:28 AM


special person


Group: Members
Posts: 542
Member No.: 23
Joined: 26-September 04



Sweet, thanks. Now I just have to get a hold of some.


--------------------
Nicholas Johnson
CODE
happy.gif
Top
hcarlton
Posted: Dec 30 2013, 10:17 PM


Newbie


Group: Members
Posts: 17
Member No.: 574
Joined: 3-October 11



Trying to wake up the threads......
Anyone notice how some pygmies tend to bend their leaves down to the ground, while others stay very upright? D. paleacea seems to enjoy being the former, makes it very difficult to feed easy.


--------------------
Never underestimate the power of what is or is not, for nothing is ever as it seems.
"Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup."
Top
« Next Oldest | Drosera, Byblis, Drosophyllum (Sundews) | Next Newest »
zIFBoards - Free Forum Hosting
Create your own social network with a free forum.
Learn More · Register for Free

Topic Options



Hosted for free by zIFBoards* (Terms of Use: Updated 2/10/2010) | Powered by Invision Power Board v1.3 Final © 2003 IPS, Inc.
Page creation time: 0.0457 seconds · Archive

Active User Color Legend
Members | Moderators | Global Moderators | Banned | Administrators
Skin is copyright of Rogue Jedi from The Jedi Temple and ifskins.com All rights reserved.
Any reproduction of this skin is strickly prohibited.
Reproducing this skin will result in punishments through the US court of Law.