View Full Version: Skeptical Scientist Credentials

Popular Technology > The Sciences > Skeptical Scientist Credentials


Title: Skeptical Scientist Credentials
Description: Working List


Andrew - August 4, 2010 08:12 PM (GMT)
John R. Christy, B.A. Mathematics Summa Cum Laude, California State University (1973); M.S. Atmospheric Science, University of Illinois (1984); Ph.D. Atmospheric Science (Thesis: "An investigation of the general circulation associated with extreme anomalies in hemispheric mean atmospheric mass"), University of Illinois (1987); Science Master, Baptist High School, Nyeri, Kenya (1973-1975); Departmental Fellow, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (1983); Senior Research Associate and Instructor, University of Alabama in Huntsville (1987-1989); Research Scientist, University of Alabama in Huntsville (1989-1991); Alabama Assistant State Climatologist (1989-1991); NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal (1991); NASA Technical Innovation Award, Marshall Space Flight Center; Assistant Professor of Atmospheric Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville (1991-1995); Associate Professor of Atmospheric Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville (1995-1999); Expert Contributor, Climate Observations, National Academy of Sciences (1995); American Meteorological Society Special Award (1996); Expert Contributor, Satellite Observations for Climate National Research Council (1997); Member, Committee on Earth Studies, Space Studies Board (1998-2001); Professor of Atmospheric Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville (1999-Present); Director, Earth System Science Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville (1991-Present); Alabama State Climatologist (2000-Present); Fellow, American Meteorological Society (2002); Expert Contributor, Statement on Climate Change, American Geophysical Union (2003); Distinguished Alumnus, Science and Mathematics, California State University, Fresno (2007); Distinguished Professor, University of Alabama in Huntsville (2008); Member, American Geophysical Union (AGU); Contributor, IPCC (1992, 1994, 1995, 2007); Expert Reviewer, IPCC (2007, 2013); Lead Author, IPCC (2001)

"I'm sure the majority (but not all) of my IPCC colleagues cringe when I say this, but I see neither the developing catastrophe nor the smoking gun proving that human activity is to blame for most of the warming we see." - John R. Christy


Patrick J. Michaels, A.B. Biological Sciences, University of Chicago (1971); S.M. Biology, University of Chicago (1975); Ph.D. Ecological Climatology, University of Wisconsin-Madison (1979); Research and Project Assistant, Center for Climatic Research, University of Wisconsin (1976-1979); Assistant Professor of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia (1980-1986); Virginia State Climatologist (1980-2007); President, Central Virginia Chapter, American Meteorological Society (1986-1987); Executive Board, American Association of State Climatologists (1986-1989); Associate Professor of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia (1986-1995); President, American Association of State Climatologists (1987-1988); Chairman, Committee on Applied Climatology, American Meteorological Society (1988-1999); Senior Fellow in Environmental Studies, Cato Institute (1992-2012); Visiting Scientist, Marshall Institute (1996-Present); Research Professor of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia (1996-2007); Member, American Association for the Advancement of Science; Member, Association of American Geographers; Member, Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society; Director, Center for the Study of Science, Cato Institute (2012-Present); Contributor and Expert Reviewer, IPCC (1990, 1992, 1995, 2001, 2007)

"A number of studies point to sources other than greenhouse gases as explanations for the modest warming trend of the late 20th century." - Patrick J. Michaels


Richard S. Lindzen, A.B. Physics Magna Cum Laude, Harvard University (1960); S.M. Applied Mathematics, Harvard University (1961); Ph.D. Applied Mathematics, Harvard University (1964); Research Associate in Meteorology, University of Washington (1964-1965); NATO Post-Doctoral Fellow, Institute for Theoretical Meteorology, University of Oslo (1965-1966); Research Scientist, National Center for Atmospheric Research (1966-1967); Visiting Lecturer in Meteorology, UCLA (1967); NCAR Outstanding Publication Award (1967); AMS Meisinger Award (1968); Associate Professor and Professor of Meteorology, University of Chicago (1968-1972); Summer Lecturer, NCAR Colloquium (1968, 1972, 1978); AGU Macelwane Award (1969); Visiting Professor, Department of Environmental Sciences, Tel Aviv University (1969); Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship (1970-1976); Gordon McKay Professor of Dynamic Meteorology, Harvard University (1972-1983); Visiting Professor of Dynamic Meteorology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1975); Lady Davis Visiting Professor, Department of Meteorology, The Hebrew University (1979); Director, Center for Earth and Planetary Physics, Harvard University (1980-1983); Robert P. Burden Professor of Dynamical Meteorology, Harvard University (1982-1983); AMS Charney Award (1985); Vikram Amblal Sarabhai Professor, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, India (1985); Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science Fellowship (1986-1987); Distinguished Visiting Scientist, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA (1988-Present); Sackler Visiting Professor, Tel Aviv University (1992); Landsdowne Lecturer, University of Victoria (1993); Bernhard Haurwitz Memorial Lecturer, American Meteorological Society (1997); Fellow, American Academy of Arts & Sciences; Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science; Fellow, American Geophysical Union; Fellow, American Meteorological Society; Member, Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters; Member, Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society; Member, National Academy of Sciences; Alfred P. Sloan Professor of Meteorology, Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1983-2013); Distinguished Senior Fellow, Center for the Study of Science, Cato Institute (2013-Present); Lead Author, IPCC (2001); Professor Emeritus of Atmospheric Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2013-Present); ISI Highly Cited Researcher

"Given that the evidence strongly implies that anthropogenic warming has been greatly exaggerated, the basis for alarm due to such warming is similarly diminished." - Richard S. Lindzen


Roy W. Spencer, B.S. Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (1978); M.S. Meteorology, University of Wisconsin, Madison (1979); Ph.D. Meteorology (Thesis: "A case study of African wave structure and energetics during Atlantic transit"), University of Wisconsin, Madison (1981); Member, Marine Observation Satellite (MOS-1) Validation Team, JAXA/NASA (1978-1990); Chairman, Hydrology Subgroup, Earth System Science Geostationary Platform Committee, NASA (1978-1990); Research Associate, Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison (1981-1983); Assistant Scientist, Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison (1983-1984); Member, Science Steering Group for the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM), NASA (1986-1989); Visiting Scientist, Universities Space Research Association, Marshall Space Flight Center, NASA (1984-1987); Member, Subcommittee on Precipitation and Winds, Earth System Science Committee, NASA (1986); Technical Advisor, Global Precipitation Climatology Project, World Meteorological Organization (1986-1992); Space Scientist, Marshall Space Flight Center, NASA (1987-1997); Member, TRMM Space Station Accommodations Analysis Study Team, NASA (1987-1991); Marshall Space Flight Center Director's Commendation (1989); Member, Earth Science and Applications Advisory Subcommittee, NASA (1990-1992); NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal (1991); Member, TOVS Pathfinder Working Group, NASA (1991-1994); U.S. Science Team Leader, Multichannel Microwave Imaging Radiometer Team, NASA (1992-1996); American Meteorological Society Special Award (1996); U.S. Science Team Leader, Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-E, NASA (1996-present); Senior Scientist for Climate Studies, Marshall Space Flight Center, NASA (1997-2001); Contributing Author, IPCC (1992, 1995, 2001); Principal Research Scientist, Earth System Science Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville (2001-Present)

"As a climate researcher, I am increasingly convinced that most of our recent global warming has been natural, not manmade." - Roy W. Spencer


S. Fred Singer, BEE, Ohio State University (1943); A.M. Physics, Princeton University (1944); Ph.D. Physics, Princeton University (1948); Research Physicist, Upper Atmosphere Rocket Program, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University (1946-1950); Scientific Liaison Officer, U.S. Office of Naval Research (1950-1953); Director, Center for Atmospheric and Space Physics, and Professor of Physics, University of Maryland (1953-1962); White House Commendation for Early Design of Space Satellites (1954); Visiting Scientist, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Cal Tech (1961-1962); First Director, National Weather Satellite Center (1962-1964); First Dean of the School of Environmental and Planetary Sciences, University of Miami (1964-1967); Deputy Assistant Secretary (Water Quality and Research), U.S. Department of the Interior (1967-1970); Deputy Assistant Administrator, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (1970-1971); Federal Executive Fellow, The Brookings Institution (1971); Professor of Environmental Science, University of Virginia (1971-1994); U.S. National Academy of Sciences Exchange Scholar, Soviet Academy of Sciences Institute for Physics of the Earth (1972); Member, Governor of Virginia Task Force on Transportation (1975); First Sid Richardson Professor, Lyndon Baines Johnson School for Public Affairs, University of Texas (1978); Vice Chairman and Member, National Advisory Committee on Oceans and Atmospheres (1981-1986); Senior Fellow, The Heritage Foundation (1982-1983); Member, U.S. Department of State Science Advisory Board (Oceans, Environment, Science) (1982-1987); Member, Acid Rain Panel, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (1982-1987); Member, Space Applications Advisory Committee, NASA (1983-1985); Member, U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Waste Panel (1984); Visiting Eminent Scholar, George Mason University (1984-1987); Chief Scientist, U.S. Department of Transportation (1987-1989); Member, White House Panel on U.S.-Brazil Science and Technology Exchange (1987); Distinguished Research Professor, Institute for Space Science and Technology (1989-1994); Director and President, Science and Environmental Policy Project (1989-Present); Guest Scholar, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Smithsonian Institute (1991); Guest Scholar, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institute (1991); Distinguished Visiting Fellow, The Hoover Institution, Stanford University (1992-1993); Distinguished Research Professor, Institute for Humane Studies, George Mason University (1994-2000); Commendation for Research on Particle Clouds, NASA (1997); Research Fellow, Independent Institute (1997-Present); Expert Reviewer, IPCC (2001, 2014)

"We see no evidence in the climate record that the increase in CO2, which is real, has any appreciable effect on the global temperature." - S. Fred Singer


Sherwood B. Idso, B.S. Physics with Distinction, University of Minnesota (1964); M.S. Soil Science with a minor in Physics, University of Minnesota (1966); Ph.D. Soil Science with a minor in Meteorology, University of Minnesota (1967); Research Assistant in Physics, University of Minnesota (1962); National Defense Education Act Fellowship (1964-1967); Research Soil Scientist, U.S. Water Conservation Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture (1967-1974); Editorial Board Member, Agricultural and Forest Meteorology Journal (1972-1993); Secretary, American Meteorological Society, Central Arizona Chapter (1973-1974); Vice-Chair, American Meteorological Society, Central Arizona Chapter (1974-1975); Research Physicist, U.S. Water Conservation Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture (1974-2001); Chair, American Meteorological Society, Central Arizona Chapter (1975-1976); Arthur S. Flemming Award (1977); Secretary, Sigma Xi - The Research Society, Arizona State University Chapter (1979-1980); President, Sigma Xi - The Research Society, Arizona State University Chapter (1980-1982); Member, Task Force on "Alternative Crops", Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (1983); Adjunct Professor of Geography and Plant Biology, Arizona State University (1984-2007); Editorial Board Member, Environmental and Experimental Botany Journal (1993-2003); President, Center for the Study of Carbon Dioxide and Global Change (2001-Present); Member, Botanical Society of America; Member, American Geophysical Union; Member, American Society of Agronomy; ISI Highly Cited Researcher

"I find no compelling reason to believe that the earth will necessarily experience any global warming as a consequence of the ongoing rise in the atmosphere's carbon dioxide concentration." - Sherwood B. Idso

Andrew - September 28, 2010 12:08 AM (GMT)
Arthur B. Robinson, B.S. Chemistry, Caltech (1963); Ph.D. BioChemistry (Thesis: "Experiments on the synthesis and spectral characterization of cytochrome-related molecules"), University of California, San Diego (1968); Assistant Professor of Chemistry, University of California, San Diego (1968-1972); Founder, Linus Pauling Institute of Science and Medicine (1973); Vice President and Assistant Director, Linus Pauling Institute (1973-1975); President and Research Director, Pauling Institute (1975-1978); President and Research Scientist, Oregon Institute of Science and Medicine (1981-Present); Editor and Publisher, Access to Energy (1993-Present); 68 Refereed Research Papers in Scholarly Journals (e.g. Nature, Science, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences)

Bruce A. Kimball, B.S. Soil Physics, University of Minnesota (1963), M.S. Soil Physics, Iowa State University (1965), Ph.D. Soil Physics, Cornell University (1970), Soil Scientist, U.S. Water Conservation Laboratory, U.S. Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service (1969-1991), Certificate of Merit, U.S. Department of Agriculture (1974, 1992, 1998), Associate Editor, Soil Science Society of America Journal (1977-1982), Associate Editor, Transactions of the ASAE (1984-1987), Fellow, American Society of Agronomy (1987), Fellow, Soil Science Society of America (1987), Associate Editor, Agronomy Journal (1989-1991), Research Leader, U.S. Water Conservation Laboratory, U.S. Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service (1991-2006), National Program Leader for Global Change, U.S. Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service (1999), Fellowship, Science and Technology Agency of Japan (2000), Collaborator, Arid-Land Agricultural Research Center, U.S. Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service (2007-Present), ISI Highly Cited Researcher; Expert Reviewer, IPCC (2007)

Chris de Freitas, B.A. (Hons), University of Toronto, Canada; M.A. University of Toronto, Canada; Ph.D. Climatology, University of Queensland, Australia (1979); Deputy Dean of Science, University of Auckland, New Zealand; Head of Science and Technology, Tamaki Campus, University of Auckland, New Zealand; Pro Vice Chancellor University of Auckland, New Zealand; Vice President, Meteorological Society of New Zealand; Founding Member, Australia New Zealand Climate Forum; Former Editor, Climate Research Journal; Executive Board, International Society of Biometeorology (1999-2001), Science Communicator Award, New Zealand Association of Scientists (1999, 2001), Expert Reviewer, IPCC (1995, 2001), Associate Professor, School of Environment, University of Auckland, New Zealand

Craig D. Idso, B.S. Geography, Arizona State University (1994); M.S. Agronomy, University of Nebraska - Lincoln (1996); Ph.D. Geography (Thesis: "Amplitude and phase changes in the seasonal atmospheric CO₂ cycle in the Northern Hemisphere"), Arizona State University (1998); President, Center for the Study of Carbon Dioxide and Global Change (1998-2001); Climatology Researcher, Office of Climatology, Arizona State University (1999-2001); Director of Environmental Science, Peabody Energy (2001-2002); Lectured in Meteorology, Arizona State University; Lectured in Physical Geography, Mesa and Chandler-Gilbert Community Colleges; Member, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); Member, American Geophysical Union (AGU); Member, American Meteorological Society (AMS); Member, Arizona-Nevada Academy of Sciences (ANAS); Member, Association of American Geographers (AAG); Member, Ecological Society of America (ECA); Member, The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi; Chairman, Center for the Study of Carbon Dioxide and Global Change (2002-Present); Lead Author, Nongovernmental International Panel on Climate Change (2009-Present)

David R. Legates, B.A. Mathematics and Geography Cum Laude, University of Delaware (1982); M.S. Climatology/Geography, University of Delaware (1985); Ph.D. Climatology (Thesis: "A climatology of global precipitation"), University of Delaware (1988); Graduate Research Assistant, University of Delaware (1982-1988); Instructor, University of Delaware (1984); Graduate Fellowship, University of Delaware (1986-1987); Visiting Research Scientist, National Climatic Data Center (1991); Assistant Professor, University of Oklahoma (1988-1994); Associate Professor, University of Oklahoma (1994-1997); Visiting Associate Professor, University of Virginia (1995-1996); Chief Research Scientist, Center for Computational Geosciences (1995-1997); Research Scientist, Southern Regional Climate Center (1998-1999); Associate Professor, Louisiana State University (1998-1999); Associate Professor of Climatology, University of Delaware (1999-2011); Certified Consulting Meteorologist, American Meteorological Society (2000); Associate Director, Delaware Space Grant Consortium, University of Delaware (2000-2006); Delaware Associate State Climatologist (2001-2005); Director, Center for Climatic Research, University of Delaware (2001-2007); Boeing Autometric Award, American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (2002); Delaware State Climatologist (2005-2011); Professor of Climatology, University of Delaware (2011-Present)

Don J. Easterbrook, B.S. Geology, University of Washington (1958); M.S. Geology with honors, University of Washington (1959); Ph.D. Geology (Thesis: "Pleistocene geology of the northern part of the Puget lowland, Washington"), University of Washington (1962); Faculty, Geology Department, Western Washington University, (1959-1963); Associate Professor of Geology, Western Washington University (1964-1967); Chairman, Department of Geology, Western Washington University (1965-1977); Member, International Union for Quaternary Research (1965-Present); Professor of Geology, Western Washington University (1968-1997); Member, International Geological Correlation Project, UNESCO (1973-1990); Associate Editor, Geomorphology Journal (1987-1995); Member, American Geophysical Union (AGU); Member, American Quaternary Association (AMQUA); Fellow, Geological Society of America (GSA); Associate Editor, Geological Society of America Bulletin (1995-Present); Professor Emeritus of Geology, Western Washington University (1997-Present)

Ernst-Georg Beck, B.A. Biology, M.A. Biology (biochemistry, plant physiology, microbiology and macromolecular chemistry), Teacher of Biology and Chemistry, State of Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany (Died: September 22, 2010)

Garth W. Paltridge, B.Sc. (Hons) Physics, University of Queensland, Australia (1961); M.Sc. Atmospheric Physics, University of Melbourne, Australia (1965); Ph.D. Atmospheric Physics, University of Melbourne, Australia (1965); Post-Doctoral Fellowship, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (1966); Senior Science Officer, Radio and Space Research Station, U.K. (1967-1968); Research Scientist, Division of Meteorological Physics, CSIRO, Australia (1968-1981); Consultant, World Climate Research Programme, World Meteorological Organisation, Geneva (1975); D.Sc. University of Queensland, Australia (1976); Senior Visiting Scientist, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (1979); Fellow, Australian Academy of Science (1980); Chief Research Scientist, Division of Marine and Atmospheric Research, CSIRO, Australia (1982-1989); Senior Visiting Scientist, U.S. National Climate Program Office (1989-1990); Professor and Director, Institute of Antarctic and Southern Ocean Studies, University of Tasmania, Australia (1990-2002); Council, Australian Academy of Science (1991-1994); Director, Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre (1991-2002); Visiting Fellow, Research School of Biology, Australian National University, Australia (2002-2011); Professor Emeritus, University of Tasmania, Australia (2002-Present)

Henrik Svensmark, MSE (Cand. Polyt) (1985); Ph.D. Physics Laboratory I, Technical University of Denmark (1987); Post Doctoral in Physics, University of California, Berkeley, Nordic Institute of Theoretical Physics, and the Niels Bohr Institute; Knud Hojgaard Anniversary Research Prize (1997); Energy-E2 Research Prize (2001); Director, Center for Sun-Climate Research, Danish Space Research Institute (DSRI)

Ian R. Plimer, B.Sc. (Hons), University of New South Wales (1968); Ph.D. Geology, Macquarie University (1973); Senior Tutor in Earth Sciences, Macquarie University (1968-1973); Lecturer in Geology, Robinson University College of the University of New South Wales (1974-1979); Chief Research Geologist, North Broken Hill Ltd. (1979-1982); Senior Lecturer in Economic Geology, University of New England (1982-1984); Professor and Chair, Department of Geology, University of Newcastle (1985-1991); Professor and Chair, Department of Geology, School of Earth Sciences, University of Melbourne (1991-2005); Daley Prize, Australian Museum (1994); Australian Humanist of the Year, Humanist Society of New South Wales (1995); Eureka Prize, Australian Museum (1995, 2002); Leopold von Buch Plakette, German Geological Society (1998); Centenary Medal, Australian Government (2001); Clarke Medal, Royal Society of New South Wales (2005); Fellow, Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering (ATSE); Fellow, Australian Institute of Geoscientists (AIG); Honorary Fellow, Geological Society of London (GSL); Member, Geological Society of Australia (GSA); Member, Royal Society of South Australia (RSSA); Member, Royal Society of New South Wales (RSNSW); Member, Royal Society of Victoria (RSV); Editor-in-Chief, Encyclopedia of Geology (Academic Press); Professor of Geology, The University of Adelaide (2005-2012); Professor Emeritus of Earth Sciences, University of Melbourne (2005-Present)

Kary Mullis, B.S. Chemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology (1966); Ph.D. Biochemistry, University of California, Berkeley (1972); Lecturer, Department of Biochemistry, University of California, Berkeley (1972); Post-Doctoral Fellow, Pediatric Cardiology, University of Kansas Medical School (1973-1977); Post-Doctoral Fellow, Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco (1977-1979); Scientist, Department of Chemistry, Cetus Corporation (1979-1984); Scientist, Department of Human Genetics, Cetus Corporation (1984-1986); Director of Molecular Biology, Xytronyx Inc. (1986-1988); William Allan Memorial Award, American Society of Human Genetics (1990); Viral Hepatitis Research Foundation of Japan Award (1991); California Scientist of the Year Award (1992); Cetus Corporation Biotechnology Research Award, American Society for Microbiology (1992); Robert Koch Prize (1992); Vice President of Research, Atomic Tags Inc. (1992-1993); Japan Prize, Science and Technology Foundation of Japan (1993); Outstanding Contributions To Clinical Chemistry Award, American Association for Clinical Chemistry (1993); Nobel Prize in Chemistry (1993); Gustavus J. Esselen Award for Chemistry in the Public Interest, American Chemical Society (1994); Hon. D.Sc. (Honorary Doctorate of Science), University of South Carolina (1994); Distinguished Visiting Professor, The University of South Carolina, College of Science and Mathematics (1994-Present); Vice President of Molecular Biology, VYREX Corporation (1997-1998); Induction, National Inventors Hall of Fame (1998); Vice President of Molecular Biology, Burstein Technologies (1999-2003); Distinguished Researcher, Children’s Hospital at Oakland Research Institute at Oakland (2003-Present); Founder and Chief Scientific Officer, Altermune, LLC (2003-Present)

"To make predictions about what follows from here and when, and to audaciously begin the discussion by implicating our humble species in the whole thing [Global Warming] is worse than audacious, it’s pathetic" - Kary Mullis


Joel M. Kauffman, B.S. Chemistry, Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science (1958); Ph.D. Organic Chemistry, MIT (1963); Faculty, University of the Sciences in Philadelphia (1979-1990); Professor of Chemistry, University of the Sciences in Philadelphia (1990-2002); Professor Emeritus of Chemistry, University of the Sciences in Philadelphia (2002-Present)

Joseph D A'leo, B.S. Meteorology Cum Laude, University of Wisconsin (1968); M.S. Meteorology, University of Wisconsin (1970); Doctoral Program, Meteorology, New York University (1972-1974); Professor and Chairman, Department of Meteorology, Lyndon State College (1974-1980); Director of Meteorology, The Weather Channel (1981-1988); Chief Meteorologist, WSI Corporation (1988-2004); Certified Consulting Meteorologist, American Meteorological Society (1989); Agricultural Forecaster, WSI Corporation (2008-2010); Chairman, Committee on Weather Analysis and Forecasting, American Meteorological Society (AMS); Fellow, American Meteorological Society (AMS); Executive Director, International Climate and Environmental Change Assessment Project (2007-2011); Chief Forecaster, WeatherBell Analytics (2011-Present)

Lee C. Gerhard, B.S. Geology, Syracuse University (1958); M.S. Geology, University of Kansas (1961); Ph.D. Geology, University of Kansas (1964); Instructor of Geology, University of Kansas (1960-1964); Assistant Professor of Geology, University of Southern Colorado (1966-1970); Associate Professor of Geology, University of Southern Colorado (1970-1972); Assistant Director and Associate Professor of Geology, West Indies Laboratory, Fairleigh Dickinson University, St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands (1972-1975); Director, West Indies Laboratory, Fairleigh Dickinson University, St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands (1975); Assistant State Geologist, North Dakota Geological Survey (1975-1977); Associate Professor of Geology, University of North Dakota (1975-1977); State Geologist and Director, North Dakota Geological Survey (1977-1981); Chairman and Professor of Geology, University of North Dakota (1977-1981); Professor of Geology, Colorado School of Mines (1982-1983); Getty Professor of Geological Engineering, Colorado School of Mines (1983-1985); Member, National Advisory Committee on Oceans and Atmosphere (1984-1986); State Geologist and Director, Kansas Geological Survey (1987-1999); Adjunct Professor of Geology, Colorado School of Mines (1987-2004), Courtesy Professor of Geology, University of Kansas (1987-Present); Principal Geologist, Kansas Geological Survey (1999-2004)

Leif Svalgaard, B.Sc. Physics, University of Copenhagen, Denmark (1964); Mag. Scient. [Ph.D.] Geophysics, University of Copenhagen, Denmark (1968); Research Assistant, Danish Meteorological Institute, Denmark (1964-1967); Observer, 'Inge Lehmann' Geomagnetic Observatory, Greenland (1967); Software Developer, Regnecentralen A/S, Denmark (1968-1971); Senior Research Physicist, Institute for Plasma Physics, Stanford University (1972-1978); U.S. Special Representative, Agreement on Cooperation in the Field of Environmental Protection with the U.S.S.R. (1976); Chief Programmer, Lockheed (1979-1983); Chief Engineer, SEMA Group, Belgium (1984-1991); Chief Programmer, Quixx Corporation (1992-1993); Director of Development, T.O.S.C. International (1994-1998); Senior Developer, PentaSafe Security Technologies (1999-2000); Research Contractor, Air Force Research Laboratory, Hanscom Air Force Base (2001-2003); Visiting Professor, Solar Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, University of Nagoya, Japan (2004); Member, International Astronomical Union; Member, Solar Cycle 24 Prediction Panel, NOAA, NASA, ISES (2006-2009); Team Member, Solar Observatories Group, Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory (HEPL), Stanford University (2009-Present)

Markus G. Dyck, M.N.R.M. [Master of Natural Resources Management] (Thesis: "Effects of tundra vehicle activity on polar bears (Ursus maritimus) at Churchill, Manitoba"), University of Manitoba (2001); Ph.D. Candidate in Biology, Queen's University; Associate Wildlife Biologist (AWB); Polar Bear Technician, Department of Sustainable Development, Government of Nunavut (2001-2003); Polar Bear Biologist, Department of Environment, Government of Nunavut (2004-present); Senior Instructor, Environmental Technology Program, Nunavut Arctic College (2009-Present)

Martin Hertzberg, B.A Chemistry Cum Laude, New York University; Ph.D. Physical Chemistry, Stanford University; Meteorology Program, U.S. Naval Postgraduate School; Meteorologist, U.S. Navy; Visiting Scholar, French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS); Fulbright Professorship; Consultant, U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA); Consultant, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Consultant, National Academy of Sciences (NAS)

Nils-Axel Morner, Fil. Kand. [B.A.], Stockholm University, Sweden (1962); Fil. Lic. [M.A.] Quaternary Geology, Stockholm University, Sweden (1965); Fil. Dr. [Ph.D.] Quaternary Geology, Stockholm University, Sweden (1969); Associate Professor of Quaternary Geology, Stockholm University, Sweden (1969-1971); Associate Professor of General and Historical Geology, Stockholm University, Sweden (1971-1980); Secretary, Neotectonics Commission, INQUA (1977-1981); Editor, Bulletin of the INQUA Neotectonics Commission (1978-1996); Professor of General and Historical Geology, Stockholm University, Sweden (1981-1991); President, Neotectonics Commission, INQUA (1981-1991); Chairman, Nordic Historical Climatology Group (1989); Professor and Head, Department of Paleogeophysics and Geodynamics, Stockholm University, Sweden (1991-2005); Co-ordinator, INTAS project on Geomagnetism and Climate (1999-2003); President, Commission on Sea Level Changes and Coastal Evolution, INQUA (1999–2003); Expert Reviewer, IPCC (2001, 2007); Professor Emeritus of Palegeophysics and Geodynamics, Stockholm University, Sweden (2005-Present); Golden Chondrite of Merit Award, University of the Algarve, Portugal (2008)

Nir J. Shaviv, B.A Physics Summa Cum Laude, Israel Institute of Technology (1990); M.S Physics, Israel Institute of Technology (1994); D.Sc. Astrophysics (Thesis: "The Origin of Gamma Ray Bursts"), Israel Institute of Technology (1996); The Wolf Award for excellence in PhD studies (1996); Lee DuBridge Prize Fellow, Theoretical Astrophysics Group, California Institute of Technology (1996-1999); Post Doctoral Fellow, Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto (1999-2001); The Beatrice Tremaine Award, Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (2000); Senior Lecturer, Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel (2001-2006); The Siegfried Samuel Wolf Lectureship in nuclear physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel (2004); Associate Professor, Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel (2006-2012); Professor, Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel (2012-Present)

Patrick Moore, B.Sc. (Hons) Forest Biology, University of British Columbia (1969); Ph.D. Ecology, Institute of Resource Ecology, University of British Columbia (1974); Ford Foundation Fellowship (1969-1972); Vice-President, Pacific Salmon Society (1969-1972); Director, Western Canada Chapter, Sierra Club (1971-1973); Co-Founder, Greenpeace (1971-1986); Member, Board of Directors, British Columbia Salmon Farmers Association (1984-1991); Founder and President, Quatsino Seafarms Ltd. (1984-1991); President, British Columbia Salmon Farmers Association (1986-1989); Member, Board of Directors, British Columbia Aquaculture Research and Development Association (1990-1993); Member, Aquaculture Advisory Council, British Columbia Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries (1990-1993); Founder and Chairman, British Columbia, Carbon Project (1990-1994); Appointment, British Columbia Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (1990-1994); Member, Power Generation Working Group, Greater Vancouver Regional District (1992); Member, Economic Development and Environment Committee, Vancouver Board of Trade (1992-1994); Director, Architectural Institute of British Columbia (1995-1996); Director and Vice-President, Environment and Government Affairs, Waterfurnace International (1995-1998); Honorary Doctorate of Sciences, North Carolina State University (2005); Founding Co-Chair, Clean and Safe Energy Coalition (2006-2013); National Award of Nuclear Science and History, National Atomic Museum Foundation (2009); Speaks Truth To Power Award, EarthFree Institute (2014); Member, Board of Directors, Forest Alliance of British Columbia (1991-Present); Co-Founder and Chief Scientist, Greenspirit (1991-Present); Chair, Ecology, Energy, and Prosperity Program, Frontier Centre for Public Policy (2014-Present)

Paul C. Knappenberger, B.A. Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia (1986); M.S. Environmental Sciences (Thesis: "Cyclone tracks and wintertime climate in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States"), University of Virginia (1990); Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia (1987-2007); Climate Researcher, Virginia State Climatology Office (1987-2007); Assistant Director, Center for the Study of Science, Cato Institute (2008-Present)

Philip A. Stott, B.A. University of London; Fellow, Linnean Society of London (FLS); Reviews Editor, Journal of Biogeography (1983-1987); Editor, Journal of Biogeography (1987-2004); Professor, Department of Geography, University of London (1990-2001); Editorial Board, Progress in Human Geography; Chairman, Anglo-Thai Society (2005-2007); Professor Emeritus of Biogeography, University of London (2001-Present); Academic Advisory Council, Global Warming Policy Foundation (2009-Present)

Richard S. Courtney, Diploma, Bath University, UK; B.A., Open University, UK; DipPhil, University of Cambridge, UK; Expert Reviewer, IPCC (2001, 2007)

Robert C. Balling Jr., A.B. Geography, Wittenberg University (1974), M.A. Geography, Bowling Green State University (1975), Ph.D. Geography, University of Oklahoma (1979), Research Fellow, Center for Agricultural Meteorology and Climatology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln (1979-1981), Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, University of Nebraska-Lincoln (1979-1984), Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, Arizona State University (1985-1986), Research Associate, Laboratory of Climatology and Department of Geography, Arizona State University (1985-1987), Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, and Assistant Director, Laboratory of Climatology, Arizona State University (1987-1988), Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, and Director, Laboratory of Climatology, Arizona State University (1988-1989), Associate Professor, Department of Geography, and Director, Office of Climatology, Arizona State University (1989-1998), Professor, Department of Geography, and Director, Office of Climatology, Arizona State University (1998-2004), Contributer, IPCC (1991-Present), Professor, School of Geographical Sciences, and Director and/or Associate Director, Masters of Advanced Study, Geographic Information Systems Program, Arizona State University (2004-Present)

Robert M. Carter, B.Sc. (Hons) Geology, University of Otago (1963); Ph.D. Palaeontology, University of Cambridge (1968); Senior University Scholar, University of Otago (1962); Commonwealth Scholarship, British Council, University of Cambridge (1964-1967); Assistant Lecturer, Department of Geology, University of Otago (1963); Senior Lecturer, Department of Geology, University of Otago (1968-1980); Nuffield Travelling Fellowship, Nuffield Foundation, University of Oxford (1974); Hochstetter Lecturer, Geological Society of New Zealand (1975); Professor and Head, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University (1981-1999); Visiting Experts Program, Carrington Polytechnic Institute (1994); Honorary Fellow, Royal Society of New Zealand (1997); Special Investigator Award, Australian Research Council (1998); Outstanding Career Award, Geological Society of New Zealand (2005); Adjunct Research Professor, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University (1999-2013); Adjunct Research Professor, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide (2001-2005); Member American Association for Advancement of Science (AAAS); Member, Geological Society of America (GSA); Member, Geological Society of Australia (GSA); Member, Geological Society of New Zealand (GSNZ); Member, International Association of Sedimentologists (IAS); Member, Society of Sedimentary Geology (SSG); Lifetime Achievement in Climate Science Award, The Heartland Institute (2015); (Died: January 19, 2016)

Roger A. Pielke Sr., B.A. Mathematics, Towson State College (1968); M.S. Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University (1969); Ph.D. Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University (1973); Research Assistant, Pennsylvania State University (1968); National Science Foundation Trainee, Pennsylvania State University (1968-1971); Research Meteorologist, Experimental Meteorology Laboratory, NOAA (1971-1974); Assistant Professor, Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia (1974-1977); Distinguished Authorship Award, NOAA (1974); Leroy Meisinger Award, American Meteorological Society (1977); Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia (1978-1981); Chief Editor, Monthly Weather Review (1981-1985); Fellow, American Meteorological Society (1982); Associate Professor of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University (1982-1985); Abell New Faculty Research and Graduate Program Award (1984); Deputy Director, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (1985-1988); Professor of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University (1985-2000), Abell Research Faculty Award (1987/1988); Researcher of the Year, Colorado State University Research Foundation (1993), Pennsylvania State Centennial Fellow (1996); Alumni of the Year, Pennsylvania State College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (1999); Colorado State Climatologist (1999-2006); Engineering Dean's Council Award, Colorado State University (2000); Adjunct Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Duke University (2003-2006); Fellow, American Geophysical Union (2004); Visiting Professor, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Arizona (2004); Senior Research Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado-Boulder (2005-Present); Senior Research Associate, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Colorado-Boulder (2005-Present); Professor Emeritus of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University (2007-Present)

Sallie L. Baliunas, S.B. Astrophysics, Villanova University (1974), A.M. Astrophysics, Harvard University (1975), Ph.D. Astrophysics, Harvard University (1980), Deputy Director, Mount Wilson Observatory (-2003), Visiting Professor, Brigham Young University; Adjunct Professor, Tennessee State University; Derek Bok Public Service Prizes, Harvard University (1988), Newton Lacey Pierce Prize, American Astronomical Society (1988), Outstanding Women Scientist, Discover Magazine (1991), Robert Wesson Endowment Fund Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University (1993-1994), Member, International Astronomical Union; Astrophysicist, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (Present)

Stephen McIntyre, B.Sc. Mathematics, University of Toronto (1969), Graduate Scholarship, Mathematics, MIT (1970); Commonwealth Scholarship, University of Oxford, UK (1970); M.A. Philosophy, Politics and Economics, University of Oxford, UK (1971), Policy Analyst, Government of Ontario, Canada; Expert Reviewer, IPCC (2007)

Stewart W. Franks, B.Sc. (Hons) Environmental Science, Lancaster University, UK; Ph.D. Environmental Science (Thesis: "The representation of land surface - atmosphere fluxes for atmospheric modelling"), Lancaster University, UK (1997); Environmental Engineer, Empresa General des Aguas Valenciana S.A. (EGEVASA), Spain (1994); Research Assistant, Centre for Research on Environmental Systems, Lancaster University, UK(1995-1997); Lecturer, Department of Environmental Engineering, University of Newcastle, Australia (1997-2003); Senior Lecturer, Department of Environmental Engineering, University of Newcastle, Australia (2003-2006); Australian National Representative, International Association of Hydrological Sciences (2005-Present); President, International Commission on Coupled Land Atmosphere System (2005-Present); Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Engineering, University of Newcastle, Australia (2006-2013); Dean of Students, University of Newcastle, Australia (2009-2011); Professor of Environmental Engineering, University of Tasmania (2013-Present); Foundation Chair of Environmental Engineering, University of Tasmania, Australia (2013-Present)

Syun-Ichi Akasofu, B.S. Geophysics, Tohoku University, Japan (1953); M.S. Geophysics, Tohoku University, Japan (1957); Ph.D. Geophysics, University of Alaska-Fairbanks (1961); Senior Research Assistant, Nagasaki University, Japan (1953-1955); Research Assistant in Geophysics, Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska-Fairbanks (1958-1961); Assistant Professor of Geophysics, Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska-Fairbanks (1961-1962); Associate Professor of Geophysics, Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska-Fairbanks (1962-1964); Professor of Geophysics, Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska-Fairbanks (1964-1986); Editorial Advisory Board, Space Science Reviews Journal (1967-1977); Editorial Advisory Board, Planetary Space Science (1969-2007); Associate Editor, Journal of Geophysical Research (1972-1974); Associate Editor, Journal of Geomagnetism & Geoelectricity (1972-2007); The Chapman Medal, Royal Astronomical Society, UK (1976); Fellow, American Geophysical Union (1977); Japan Academy Prize, The Japan Academy Award (1977); Member, Editorial Committee, Space Science Reviews (1977-2007); John Adam Fleming Medal, American Geophysical Union (1979); Distinguished Alumnus, University of Alaska (1980); Most-Cited Contemporary Scientists, Institute for Scientific Information Current Contents (1981); Distinguished Visiting Scientist, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology (1983-2007); Head, Department of Physics, University of Alaska-Fairbanks (1984-1986); Sydney Chapman Chair Professorship, University of Alaska (1985); Member, International Academy of Aeronautics, France (1986); Director, Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska-Fairbanks (1986-1999); Centennial Alumni, National Association of State Universities & Land Grant Colleges (1987); Fellow, Arctic Institute of North America (1987); Award, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan (1993); Award, Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications of Japan (1996); Edith R. Bullock Prize for Excellence, University of Alaska (1997); Founding Director, International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska-Fairbanks (1998-2007); Alaskan of the Year-Denali Award (1999); Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science (2001); ISI Highly Cited Researcher (2002); Aurora Award, Fairbanks Convention and Visitors Bureau (2003); Order of the Sacred Treasure, Gold and Silver Star, Emperor of Japan (2003); Dedicated, Syun-Ichi Akasofu Building, University of Alaska-Fairbanks (2007); Professor Emeritus of Physics and Director Emeritus, University of Alaska-Fairbanks (2007-Present)

Timothy F. Ball, B.A. (Hons) Geography, University of Winnipeg, Canada (1970); M.A. Geography, University of Manitoba, Canada (1971); Ph.D. Climatology (Thesis: "Climatic Change in Central Canada: A Preliminary Analysis of Weather Information from Hudson's Bay Company Forts at York Factory and Churchill Factory, 1714-1850"), Queen Mary College, University of London, UK (1983); Instructor, Department of Geography, University of Winnipeg, Canada (1971-1972); Lecturer, Department of Geography, University of Winnipeg, Canada (1972-1982); Acting Dean of Students, University of Winnipeg (1977-1978); Founder and Director, Rupert's Land Research Centre (1980-1996); Member, Manitoba Water Commission (1980-1996); Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, University of Winnipeg, Canada (1982-1984); Associate Professor, Department of Geography, University of Winnipeg, Canada (1984-1988); Professor, Department of Geography, University of Winnipeg, Canada (1988-1996); Environmentalist and Consultant (1996-Present)

Vincent R. Gray, M.A., Ph.D. Physical Chemistry, University of Cambridge (1946); Founder, New Zealand Climate Science Coalition; Visiting Scholar, Beijing Climate Centre, China; Fellow, New Zealand Institute of Chemistry; Expert Reviewer, IPCC (1990, 1992, 1995, 2001, 2007)

Wei-Hock "Willie" Soon, B.Sc. Aerospace Engineering Cum Laude, University of Southern California (1985); M.Sc. Aerospace Engineering, University of Southern California (1987); Ph.D. Rocket Science with distinction (Thesis: "Non-equilibrium kinetics in high-temperature gases"), University of Southern California (1991); Graduate Scholastic Award, IEEE Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society (1989); Rockwell Dennis Hunt Scholastic Award, University of Southern California (1991); Member, Tau Beta Phi (National Engineering Honor Society); Member, Sigma Gamma Tau (National Aerospace Engineering Honor Society); Post-Doctoral Fellow, Solar, Stellar, and Planetary Sciences Division, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (1991-1996); Astronomer, Mount Wilson Observatory (1992-2009); Astrophysicist and Geoscientist, Solar, Stellar, and Planetary Sciences Division, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (1997-Present); Visiting Professor, Department of Science and Environmental Studies, University of Putra, Malaysia (1999-2000); Annual Reviewer, Progress in Physical Geography Journal (2001-2002); Senior Scientist, George C. Marshall Institute (2001-2003); Former Member, American Astrophysical Society (AAS); Former Member, American Geophysical Union (AGU); Former Member, International Astronomical Union (IAU); Receiving Editor, New Astronomy Journal (2002-Present); Member, CANSTAT Advisory Board, Fraser Institute (2002-Present); Member, Advisory Board, National Center for Public Policy Research (2002); Smithsonian Institution Award for "Official Recognition of Work Performance Reflecting a High Standard of Accomplishment" (2003); Science Director, Center for Science and Public Policy (2003-2006); Petr Beckmann Award for "Courage and Achievement in Defense of Scientific Truth and Freedom" (2004); Chief Scientist, Science and Public Policy Institute (2007-2010); Senior Visiting Fellow, State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, China (2013-2014); Courage in Defense of Science Award (2014)

William M. Briggs, B.S. Meteorology and Math Summa Cum Laude, Central Michigan University (1992); M.S. Atmospheric Science, Cornell University, (1995); Ph.D. Statistics, Cornell University (2004); Cryptographer, U.S. Air Force (1983-1989); Meteorologist, National Weather Service (1992-1993); Statistician, Gotham Risk Management (2002-2003); Assistant Professor of Statistics, Weill Cornell Medical College (2003-2007); Adjunct Assistant Professor of Statistical Science, Cornell University (2004-2007); Visiting Professor of Statistics, Central Michigan University (2007); Research scientist, New York Methodist Hospital (2003-2010); Member, American Statistical Association; Member, Institute of Mathematical Statistics; Member, American Meteorological Society; Member, American Geophysical Union; Member, American Association for the Advancement of Science; Member, Probability and Statistics Committee, American Meteorological Society (through 2011); Associate Editor, Monthly Weather Review (through 2011); Reviewer, Journal of the American Statistical Association; Reviewer, Monthly Weather Review (AMS Journal); Reviewer, Weather and Forecasting (AMS Journal); Reviewer, Journal of Geophysical Research; Statistical Consultant, Various Companies (1998-Present); Adjunct Professor of Statistical Science, Cornell University (2004-Present)

William Kininmonth, B.Sc. University of Western Australia; M.Sc., Colorado State University; M.Admin, Monash University; Superintendent, National Climate Centre, Bureau of Meteorology, Australian Government (1986-1998); Member, Australian Delegation, Second World Climate Conference (1990); Member, Australian Delegation, United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (1991-1992); Commission for Climatology (CCI), WMO

Zbigniew Jaworowski, M.D., Medical Academy in Krakow, Poland (1952), Ph.D. Natural Sciences (1963), D.Sc. Natural Sciences (1967), Assistant, Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Medical Academy in Krakow, Poland (1951-1952), Radiotherapeutist, Oncological Institute in Gliwice, Poland (1953-1958), Medical Doctor, Polish International Geophysical Year Expedition to Spitsbergen (1957-1958), Head, Laboratory of Radiotoxicology, Institute of Nuclear Research, Warsaw, Poland (1958-1970), Stipendiary, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Research Cancer Institute in London, UK (1960-1961), Head, Department of Radiation Hygiene, Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection, Warsaw, Poland (1970-1987), Member, United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) (1973-2010), Vice Chairman, United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) (1978-1979), Chairman, United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) (1981-1982), Guest Professor, Centre d'Etude Nucleaires, Fontenay-aux-Roses, France (1982-1984), Member, Polish Governmental Commission on the Effects of Chernobyl Accident (1986), Biophysical Group of the Institute of Physics, University of Oslo, Norway (1987-1988), Visiting Professor, The National Institute for Polar Research in Tokyo, Japan (1990-1991), Norwegian Polar Research Institute, Norway (1988-1990), Institute for Energy Technology, Norway (1991-1993), Chairman, Scientific Council of the Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection in Warsaw, Poland (1993-2010); (Died: November 12, 2011)

Andrew - November 7, 2010 01:37 PM (GMT)
Engineers:

Arthur Rorsch, B.S. Chemical Engineering, University of Delft (1957); Ph.D. Chemical Engineering, Leiden University, Netherlands (1963); Associate Editor, Mutation Research Journal (1964-1980); Associate Professor of Molecular Genetics, Leiden University, Netherlands (1967-1997); Member, Scientific Advisory Committee, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Netherlands (1971-1976); Vice President, Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), Netherlands (1980-1995); Assistant Director, Medical Biological Perspective (1987-1993); Knight, Order of the Netherlands Lion (1995); Chairman, National Council for Agricultural Research, Netherlands (1995-1999)

David Evans, B.Sc. Applied Mathematics and Physics, University Of Sydney, Australia (1979); M.A. Applied Mathematics, University Of Sydney, Australia (1980); B.E. Electrical Engineering (First-Class Honors), University Of Sydney, Australia (1983); University Medal, University Of Sydney, Australia (1983); M.S. Statistics, Stanford University (1984); M.S. Electrical Engineering, Stanford University (1985); Ph.D. Electrical Engineering, Stanford University (1989); Engineer, Department of Main Roads, New South Wales, Australia (1981-1982); Engineer, Telecom Australia (1983); Research Assistant, Electrical Engineering Department, Stanford University (1984-1988); Electronics Technician, Chemistry Department, Stanford University (1988); Staff Scientist & Software Engineer, KLA Instruments Corporation (1989-1990); Information Engineer, Aquatech Pty Ltd (1994-1996); Applications Programmer and Modeler, Canberra (1996–2005); Carbon Accounting Modeler, Australian Greenhouse Office and Department of Climate Change, Australian Government (1999-2005); Consultant, Australian Greenhouse Office and Department of Climate Change, Australian Government (2008-2010)

Henry R. Linden, B.S. Chemical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology (1944), M.S. Chemical Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn (1947), Ph.D. Chemical Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology (1952), Faculty, Illinois Institute of Technology (1954-2009), Henry H. Storch Award in Fuel Chemistry, American Chemical Society (1967), President, Institute of Gas Technology (1974), President, Gas Research Institute (1977-1987), Illinois Institute of Technology Hall of Fame (1982), Advisor, Energy Engineering Board of the National Research Council (1986-1993), Frank W. Gunsaulus Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology (1987-1989), Advisor, Electric Power Research Institute (1987-1993), President, Illinois Institute of Technology (1989-1990), Max McGraw Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology (1990-2009), Director, Energy + Power Center, Illinois Institute of Technology (1990-2009), Homer H. Lowry Award, U. S. Department of Energy (1991), Member, Hydrogen Technical Advisory Panel, U.S. Department of Energy (1992-2003), United States Energy Award, U.S. Energy Association (1993), Georgia Techs Engineering Hall of Fame (1996), Ernest W. Thiele Award, American Institute of Chemical Engineers (2000), Henry R. Linden Endowed Professorship Established, Illinois Institute of Technology (2000), Advisor, Wanger Institute for Sustainable Energy Research; Member, National Academy of Engineering; Fellow, American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Fellow, Institute of Energy; Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science; (Died: September 13, 2009)

Indur M. Goklany, B.Tech. Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, India (1968); M.S. Electrical Engineering, Michigan State University (1969); Ph.D. Electrical Engineering, Michigan State University (1973); Julian Simon Fellow, Property and Environment Research Center (2000); Visiting Fellow, American Enterprise Institute (2002-2003); Julian Simon Award (2007); Rapporteur and Principal Author, Resource Use and Management Subgroup, IPCC (1988-1992); Reviewer, WGI, II, and III Reports, IPCC (1989-1991); U.S. Delegate, IPCC (1988-1992, 2003-2004); U.S. Technical Advisor, Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee for UNFCCC (1990-1992); US Delegate, UNFCCC (2007); Expert Reviewer, IPCC (2005-2007); Assistant Director of Programs & Science & Technology Policy, U.S. Department of the Interior (Present)

John R. Stubbles, B.Sc. (1st Class Hons.) Metallurgy, Manchester University, UK (1954); Ph.D. Physical Chemistry, Imperial College, London University, UK (1957); Member, AIST (1958-2009); Research, Princeton University (1958-1959); Lecturer, Manchester University, UK (1960-1963); Distinguished Member, AIST (1984), Manager of Technology, Environmental Program, Charter Steel Co. (1993-1999); L.G. Kuhn Award, AIST (1994) John Elliott Lecturer, AIST (1995-96); Howe Memorial Lecturer, AIST (1997); Private Consultant, U.S. Department of Energy (1999-2009); (Died: October, 2009)

Lance A. Endersbee, B.C.E. (Hons) University of Melbourne, Australia (1949); M.E. University of Melbourne, Australia (1967); Field Engineer, Scientific Services Division, Snowy Mountains Hydro-electric Authority, Australia (1950-1951); Engineer and Executive Engineer, Dams and Tunnels Design Section, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Australia (1952-1957); Hydro-Electric Commission, Tasmania, (1957-1974); Project Design Engineer, Great Lake Power Development, Tasmania (1958-1962); Warren Memorial Prize, Institution of Engineers, Australia (1963); Advisor, Dam Design and Hydro-Electric Power Development, United Nations (1964); Chapman Medal, Institution of Engineers, Australia (1967); Vice-President, International Society for Rock Mechanics (1966-1970); Chairman, National Committee on Engineering Education, Institution of Engineers, Australia (1973–75); Honorary Associate, School of Civil Engineering, University of New South Wales, Australia (1974); Dean, Faculty of Engineering, Monash University, Australia (1976-1988); National Energy Advisory Committee, Monash University, Australia (1977-1980); Honorary Member, Engineering Institute of Canada (1979); President, Institution of Engineers, Australia (1980-1981); AO, Officer of the Order of Australia (1981); Member, Advisory Committee in Science and Technology, National Library, Australia (1982); Peter Nicol Russell Memorial Medal, Institution of Engineers, Australia (1986); Pro Vice-Chancellor, Monash University, Australia (1988-1989); Professor Emeritus, Monash University, Australia; (Died: October, 2009)

Robert H. Essenhigh, B.A. Natural Sciences, University of Cambridge, UK (1951); M.S. Natural Sciences, University of Cambridge, UK (1955); Ph.D. Chemical Engineering, University of Sheffield, UK (1959); Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University (1966-1971); Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University (1972-1977); E.G. Bailey Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Ohio State University (1978-2008); Percy Nicholls Award (1994), Professor Emeritus, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ohio State University (2008-Present)

Andrew - November 7, 2010 01:44 PM (GMT)
Physicists:

David H. Douglass, B.S. Physics, University of Maine; Ph.D. Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1959); Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1959-1961); Member, Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1961); Assistant Professor of Physics, University of Chicago; Associate Professor of Physics, University of Chicago; Professor of Physics, University of Chicago; Fellow, American Physical Society; Professor of Physics, University of Rochester (1968-Present)

Edward Teller, B.S. Chemical Engineering, University of Karlsruhe (1928), Ph.D. Physics, University of Leipzig (1930), Research Associate, University of Leipzig (1929–1931), Research Associate, University of Göttingen (1931–1933), Rockefeller Fellow, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Copenhagen (1933–1934), Lecturer, London City College (1934), Professor of Physics, George Washington University (1935-1941), Researcher, Manhattan Project, Chicago Metallurgical Laboratory (1942-1943), Group Leader, Manhattan Project, Los Alamos National Laboratory (1943-1946), Professor of Physics, University of Chicago (1946-1952), Member, National Academy of Sciences (1948), Assistant Director, Los Alamos National Laboratory (1949-1952), Developer, Hydrogen Bomb (1951), Founder, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (1952), Professor of Physics, University of California, Berkeley (1953-1975), Associate Director, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (1954–1958), Harrison Medal (1955), Albert Einstein Award (1958), Director, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (1958-1960), Professor, Hoover Institution on War Revolution and Peace, Stanford University (1960–1975), Enrico Fermi Award, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (1962), Senior Research Fellow, Hoover Institution (1975-2003), Professor Emeritus of Physics, University of California, Berkeley (1975–2003), National Medal of Science (1982), Presidential Medal of Freedom (2003), (Died: September 9, 2003)

"Society's emissions of carbon dioxide may or may not turn out to have something significant to do with global warming--the jury is still out." - Edward Teller


Frederick Seitz, A.B. Mathematics, Stanford University (1932), Ph.D. Physics, Princeton University (1934), Proctor Fellow, Princeton University (1934–1935), Instructor in Physics, University of Rochester (1935–1936), Assistant Professor of Physics, University of Rochester (1936–1937), Research Physicist, General Electric Company (1937–1939), Assistant Professor of Physics, University of Pennsylvania (1939–1941), Associate Professor of Physics, University of Pennsylvania (1941-1942), Professor of Physics, Carnegie Institute of Technology (1942-1949), Research Professor of Physics, University of Illinois (1949-1965), Chairman, American Institute of Physics (1954-1960), President Emeritus, American Physical Society (1961), President Emeritus, National Academy of Sciences (1962-1969), Graduate College Dean, University of Illinois (1964-1965), President Emeritus, Rockefeller University (1968-1978), Franklin Medal (1965), American Institute of Physics Compton Medal (1970), National Medal of Science (1973), (Died: March 2, 2008)

"Research data on climate change do not show that human use of hydrocarbons is harmful. To the contrary, there is good evidence that increased atmospheric carbon dioxide is environmentally helpful." - Frederick Seitz


Freeman J. Dyson, Scholar, Winchester College, UK (1936-1941); B.A. Mathematics, University of Cambridge, UK (1945); Operations Research, R.A.F. Bomber Command, UK (1943-1945); Research Fellow, Trinity College, Cambridge University, UK (1946–1947); Commonwealth Fellow, Cornell University (1947–1948); Commonwealth Fellow, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton University (1948–1949); Research Fellow, University of Birmingham (1949–1951); Professor of Physics, Cornell University (1951-1953); Fellow, Royal Society (1952); Professor of Physics, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton University (1953-1994); Chairman, Federation of American Scientists (1962-1963); Member, National Academy of Sciences (1964); Danny Heineman Prize, American Physical Society (1965); Lorentz Medal, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (1966); Visiting Professor, Yeshiva University (1967-1968); Hughes Medal, The Royal Society (1968); Max Planck Medal, German Physical Society (1969); J. Robert Oppenheimer Memorial Prize, Center for Theoretical Studies (1970); Visiting Professor, Max Planck Institute for Physics and Astrophysics (1974-1975); Corresponding Member, Bavarian Academy of Sciences (1975); Harvey Prize, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology (1977); Wolf Prize in Physics, Wolf Foundation of Herzlia, Israel (1981); National Books Critics Circle Award - Non-Fiction (1984); Andrew Gemant Award, American Institute of Physics (1988); Phi Beta Kappa Award in Science, Phi Beta Kappa Society (1988); Honorary Fellow, Trinity College, Cambridge University, UK (1989); Foreign Associate of the Academy of Sciences, Paris, France (1989); Member, National Research Council Commission on Life Sciences (1989-1991); Britannica Award (1990); Matteucci Medal, National Academy of Sciences dei Quaranta, Italy (1990); Oersted Medal, American Association of Physics Teachers (1991); Enrico Fermi Award, U.S. Department of Energy (1993); Montgomery Fellow, Dartmouth College (1994); Wright Prize, Harvey Mudd College (1994); Antonio Feltrinelli International Prize, Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, Italy (1996); Lewis Thomas Prize, Rockefeller University (1996); Joseph A. Burton Forum Award, American Physical Society (1999); Rydell Professor, Gustavus Adolphus College (1999); Honorary Member, London Mathematical Society (2000); Templeton Prize (2000); Member, NASA Advisory Council (2001-2003); Page-Barbour lecturer, University of Virginia (2004); Member, committee on Next Generation Biowarfare (2004-2005); Professor Emeritus of Physics, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton University (1994-Present); 21 Honorary Degrees

"My first heresy says that all the fuss about global warming is grossly exaggerated. Here I am opposing the holy brotherhood of climate model experts and the crowd of deluded citizens who believe the numbers predicted by the computer models. Of course, they say, I have no degree in meteorology and I am therefore not qualified to speak. But I have studied the climate models and I know what they can do. The models solve the equations of fluid dynamics, and they do a very good job of describing the fluid motions of the atmosphere and the oceans. They do a very poor job of describing the clouds, the dust, the chemistry and the biology of fields and farms and forests. They do not begin to describe the real world that we live in. The real world is muddy and messy and full of things that we do not yet understand. It is much easier for a scientist to sit in an air-conditioned building and run computer models, than to put on winter clothes and measure what is really happening outside in the swamps and the clouds. That is why the climate model experts end up believing their own models." - Freeman Dyson


Gerhard Gerlich, Diplom (M.S.) Physics, University of Kiel, Germany (1967); Dr. rer. nat. (Ph.D.) Physics, Braunschweig University of Technology, Germany (1970); Assistant Professor of Physics, Braunschweig University of Technology, Germany (1970-1975); Associate Professor of Physics, Braunschweig University of Technology, Germany (1975-1978); Professor of Physics, Institute for Mathematical Physics, Braunschweig University of Technology, Germany (1978-Present)

Harold W. Lewis, B.A. Physics, New York University (1943), M.A. Physics, University of California, Berkeley (1944), Ph.D. Physics, University of California, Berkeley (1948), Electronic Technician, U.S. Navy, WWII (1944-1946), Fellow in Physics (Supervisor: Robert Oppenheimer), University of California, Berkeley (1946-1947), Member (Supervisor: Robert Oppenheimer), Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton University (1947-1948), Assistant Professor of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara (1948-1950), Research Physicist, Bell Laboratories (1951-1956), Research Physicist, University of Wisconsin-Madison (1957-1964), Member, JASON Advisory Group (1960-) Chairman, Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara (1965-), Professor of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara (1965-) Director, Quantum Institute, Los Alamos Laboratory (1969-1973), Chairman, JASON Advisory Group (1966-1973), Chairman, Light-Water Reactor Safety Study Group, American Physical Society (1975), Chairman, Risk Assessment Review Group, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (1977-1979), Chairman, Task Force on Atmospheric Obscuration, Defense Science Board (1985), Member, American Physical Society (1943-2010), Former Member, Defense Science Board, Former Member, U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, Fellow, American Physical Society (-2010), Science Writing Award, American Institute of Physics (1991), Professor Emeritus of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara

Ivar Giaever, M.E., Norwegian Institute of Technology (1952); Ph.D. Theoretical Physics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (1964); Engineer, Advanced Engineering Program, General Electric Company (1954–1956); Applied Mathematician, Research and Development Center, General Electric Company (1956–1958); Researcher, Research and Development Center, General Electric Company (1958–1988); Guggenheim Fellowship, Biophysics, Cambridge University (1969-1970); Oliver E. Buckley Condensed Matter Prize (1965); Nobel Prize in Physics (1973); Member, American Academy of Arts & Sciences (1974); Member, National Academy of Science (1974); Member, National Academy of Engineering (1975); Adjunct Professor of Physics, University of California, San Diego (1975); Visiting Professor, Salk Institute for Biological Studies (1975); Professor of Physics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (1988-2005); Founder and Chief Technology Officer, Applied BioPhysics (1991-Present); Professor Emeritus of Physics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (2005-Present)

"I'm a skeptic. ...Global Warming it's become a new religion. You're not supposed to be against Global Warming. You have basically no choice. And I tell you how many scientists support that. But the number of scientists is not important. The only thing that's important is if the scientists are correct; that's the important part." - Ivar Giaever


Laurence I. Gould, B.S. Physics, Carnegie-Mellon University (1964); M.A. in Physics, Temple University (1975); Ph.D. Physics, Temple University (1982); Copy Editor, Physical Review, American Institute of Physics (1964-1966); Research Associate, Machlett Laboratories (Division of Raytheon) (1967-1969); Chief Programmer, Polytechnic Institute of New York (1970-1972); Math Instructor, Philadelphia College of Textiles & Science (1979-1982); Assistant Professor of Physics, Beaver College (1980); Visiting Assistant Professor of Physics, Temple University (1982-1985); Assistant Professor of Physics, Penn State University (1984); Assistant Professor of Physics, University of Hartford (1985-1989); Associate Professor of Physics, University of Hartford (1989-1994); Professor of Physics, University of Hartford (1994-Present)

Lubos Motl, B.Sc. Theoretical and Mathematical Physics, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic (1997); Ph.D. Theoretical Physics (Thesis: "Nonperturbative Formulations of Superstring Theory"), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University (2001); Academic Senate, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic (1994-1997); Junior Fellow (Theoretical Physics - String Theory), Society of Fellows, Harvard University (2001–2004); Richard J. Plano Dissertation Prize, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University (2002); Assistant Professor of Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Harvard University (2004–2007); Physicist, Jefferson Physical Laboratory, Harvard University (2004-2007); Physicist, Czech Republic (2007-Present)

Nicola Scafetta, Laurea in Physics, Università di Pisa, Italy (1997); Ph.D. Physics (Thesis: "An entropic approach to the analysis of time series"), University of North Texas (2001); Research Associate, Physics Department, Duke University (2002-2004); Research Scientist, Physics Department, Duke University (2005-2009); Visiting Lecturer, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (2008, 2010); Visiting Lecturer, University of North Carolina Greensboro (2008-2009); Adjunct Professor, Elon University (2010); Assistant Adjunct Professor, Duke University (2010-2012); Member, Editorial Board, Dataset Papers in Geosciences Journal; Member, American Physical Society (APS); Member, American Geophysical Union (AGU); Research Scientist, ACRIM Science Team (2010-Present)

Robert Jastrow, A.B. Physics, Columbia University (1944), A.M. Physics, Columbia University (1945), Ph.D. Physics, Columbia University (1948), Adjunct Professor of Geophysics, Columbia University (1944–1982), Postdoctoral Fellow, Leiden University, Netherlands (1948-1949), Scholar, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton University (1949-1950, 1953), Assistant Professor of Physics, Yale University (1953-1954), Chief, NASA Theoretical Division (1958-61), Founding Director, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (1961-1981), NASA Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement (1968), Professor of Earth Sciences, Dartmouth College (1981-1992), Chairman, Mount Wilson Institute (1992–2003), (Died: February 8, 2008)

"The scientific facts indicate that all the temperature changes observed in the last 100 years were largely natural changes and were not caused by carbon dioxide produced in human activities." - Robert Jastrow


Robert Laughlin, A.B. Mathematics, University of California, Berkeley (1972); Ph.D. Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1979); Fellow, IBM (1976-1978); Postdoctoral Member, Technical Staff, Bell Laboratories (1979–1981); Research Physicist, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (1982–2004); Associate Professor of Physics, Stanford University (1985–1989); E.O. Lawrence Award for Physics (1985); Oliver E. Buckley Condensed Matter Prize (1986); Eastman Kodak Lecturer, University of Rochester (1989); Professor of Physics, Stanford University (1989–1993); Fellow, American Academy of Arts & Sciences (1990); Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Physics, Stanford University (1992–Present); Professor of Applied Physics, Stanford University (1993-2007); Member, National Academy of Sciences (1994), Nobel Prize in Physics (1998); Board Member, Science Foundation Ireland (2002-2003); President, Asia-Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics (2004-2006); President, Korean Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (2004–2006)

"The geologic record suggests that climate ought not to concern us too much when we’re gazing into the energy future, not because it’s unimportant, but because it’s beyond our power to control." - Robert Laughlin


William Happer, B.S. Physics, University of North Carolina (1960); Ph.D. Physics, Princeton University (1964); Research Physicist, Columbia University (1964-1965); Professor, Department of Physics, Columbia University (1965-1980); Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship (1966); Co-Director, Columbia Radiation Laboratory, Columbia University (1971-1976); Director, Columbia Radiation Laboratory, Columbia University (1976-1979); Member, JASON Advisory Group (1976-Present); Alexander von Humboldt Award (1976); Professor of Physics, Princeton University (1980-1991); Chairman, Steering Committee, JASON Advisory Group (1987-1990); Member, Board of Trustees, MITRE Corporation (1987-2011); Class of 1909 Professor of Physics Award, Princeton University (1988); Director, Office of Energy Research, U.S. Department of Energy (1991-1993); Professor of Physics, Princeton University (1993-1995); Eugene Higgens Professor of Physics, Princeton University (1995-2003); Chairman, University Research Board, Princeton University (1995-2005); Member, National Academy of Sciences (1996); Herbert P. Broida Prize, American Physical Society (1997); Davisson-Germer Prize in Atomic or Surface Physics, American Physical Society (1999); Thomas Alva Edison Patent Award, Research & Development Council of New Jersey (2000); Member, Science and Technology Advisory Committee, U.S. Department of Homeland Security (2002-2005); Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Member, American Philosophical Society; Fellow, American Physical Society (APS); Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); Cyrus Fogg Brackett Professor of Physics, Princeton University (2003-Present)

"Increasing CO2 levels will be a net benefit because cultivated plants grow better and are more resistant to drought at higher CO2 levels, and because warming and other supposedly harmful effects of CO2 have been greatly exaggerated." - William Happer

"I have spent my professional life studying the interactions of visible and infrared radiation with gases – one of the main physical phenomena behind the greenhouse effect. I have published over 200 papers in peer reviewed scientific journals. I am a member of a number of professional organizations, including the American Physical Society and the National Academy of Sciences. I also served as the Director of Energy Research at the Department of Energy (DOE) from 1990 to 1993, where I supervised all of DOE’s work on climate change." - William Happer


William Nierenberg, B.S. Physics, City College of New York (1939), M.A. Physics, Columbia University (1942), Ph.D. Physics, Columbia University (1947), Researcher, Manhattan Project, Columbia SAM Laboratories (1942-1945), Instructor in Physics, Columbia University (1946–1948), Assistant Professor of Physics, University of Michigan (1948–1950), Associate Professor of Physics, University of California, Berkeley (1950-1953), Professor of Physics, University of California, Berkeley (1954–1965), Assistant Secretary General for Scientific Affairs, NATO (1960-1962), Director Emeritus, Scripps Institution of Oceanography (1965-1986), Member, White House Task Force on Oceanography (1969-1970), Member, National Academy of Sciences (1971), Chairman, National Advisory Committee on Oceans and Atmosphere (1971-1975), Member, National Advisory Committee on Oceans and Atmosphere (1971–1978), Member, National Science Board (1972–1978, 1982–1988), Chairman, Advisory Council, NASA (1978-1982), Member, Space Panel, Naval Studies Board, National Research Council (1978–1984), Member, Council of the National Academy of Sciences (1979-1982), Chairman, Carbon Dioxide Assessment Committee, National Academy of Sciences (1980–1983), NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal (1982), (Died: September 10, 2000)

"The available data on climate change, however, do not support these predictions, nor do they support the idea that human activity has caused, or will cause, a dangerous increase in global temperatures. ...These facts indicate that theoretical estimates of the greenhouse problem have greatly exaggerated its seriousness." - William Nierenberg

Andrew - November 15, 2010 04:07 PM (GMT)
Social Scientists:

Abraham J. Wyner, B.S. Mathematics Magna Cum Laude, Yale University (1988), Ph.D. Statistics, Stanford University (1993), National Science Foundation Fellowship (1989-1991), Acting Assistant Professor of Statistics, Stanford University (1993-1995), National Science Foundation Post-Doctoral Fellowship in the Mathematical Sciences (1995-1998), Visiting Assistant Professor of Statistics, University of California, Berkeley (1995-1998), Assistant Professor of Statistics, University of Pennsylvania (1998-2005), Associate Professor of Statistics, University of Pennsylvania (2005-Present)

Alan Carlin, B.S. Physics, California Institute of Technology (1959); Ph.D. Economics (Thesis: "An evaluation of U.S. government aid to India") Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1964); Foreign Area Fellow, Ford Foundation (1960-1963); Economist, The RAND Corporation (1963-1971); Director, Implementation Research Division, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (1971-1974); Editorial Board, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management (2 years); Founding Member, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists (1979-Present); Senior Operations Research Analyst, Office of Research and Development and Office of Policy, Economics, and Innovation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (1974-2010)

Alex Epstein, B.A. Philosophy, Duke University (2002); Network Model Development and Application Training, OPNET Technologies (1996-2000); Freelance Writer (2001-2004); Objectivist Academic Center, Ayn Rand Institute (2004); Fellow, Ayn Rand Institute (2004-2011); Director, Center for Industrial Progress (2011-Present); Adjunct Scholar, Cato Institute (2015-Present)

Benny J. Peiser, Ph.D. Social Anthropology; Fellow, Royal Astronomical Society; Visiting Fellow, University of Buckingham, UK; Member, Spaceguard UK; Co-Editor, Energy & Environment Journal; Scientific Advisor, Lifeboat Foundation; Senior Lecturer in Social Anthropology, Liverpool John Moores University, UK; Director, Global Warming Policy Foundation

Bjørn Lomborg, M.A. Political Science, University of Aarhus, Denmark (1991); Ph.D. Political Science (Thesis: "Simulating Social Science: The Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma and Computer Simulations in Political Science"), University of Copenhagen, Denmark (1994); Georgia Rotary Student Foundation Scholarship, University of Georgia (1983); Undergraduate, Computer Science and Mathematics, University of Georgia (1983-1984); Kossack Prize of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Georgia (1984); Assistant Professor of Statistics, Department of Political Science, University of Aarhus, Denmark (1994-1996); Associate Professor of Statistics, Department of Political Science, University of Aarhus, Denmark (1997-2005); Director, Environmental Assessment Institute (EAI), Denmark (2002-2004); Organizer, Copenhagen Consensus (2004); Adjunct Professor of Policy-making, Scientific Knowledge and the Role of Experts, Department of Management, Politics and Philosophy, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark (2005-2015); Director, Copenhagen Consensus Center, Denmark (2006-Present)

Blakeley B. McShane, B.S. Economics Summa Cum Laude, University of Pennsylvania (2003), B.A. Mathematics Summa Cum Laude, University of Pennsylvania (2003), M.A. Mathematics, University of Pennsylvania (2003), Studies in Philosophy, University of Oxford (2004-2005), M.A. Statistics, University of Pennsylvania (2010), Ph.D. Statistics, University of Pennsylvania (2010), Donald P. Jacobs Scholar; Assistant Professor of Marketing, Northwestern University (2010-Present)

Edward T. "Terry" Wimberley, B.A. Psychology, Stetson University (1971), M.S.W. Mental Health, University of Pittsburgh (1975), Ph.D. Public Administration, University of Pittsburgh (1982), Field Instructor, Graduate School of Counselor Education, Arizona State University (1981-1982), Assistant Professor of Preventive Medicine & Community Health, University of Texas Medical Branch (1982-1990), Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellow (1989-1990), Chairman and Associate Professor, Department of Mental Health and Human Services, College of Health Sciences, Georgia State University (1990-1995), Director, Gerontology Center, College of Health Sciences, Georgia State University (1991-1993), Founding Dean, College of Professional Studies, Florida Gulf Coast University (1995-1997), Associate Professor of Public Administration, Social Work & Human Services, Florida Gulf Coast University (1997-1999), Professor of Ecological Studies, Florida Gulf Coast University (1999-Present)

Emil A. Røyrvik, M.A. Social Anthropology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (1998); Ph.D. Social Anthropology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (2008); Post Doctoral Fellow, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (2009–2011); Visiting Research Scholar, City University of New York (2010); Senior Research Scientist, SINTEF (1999-Present); Member, American Anthropological Association

Michael Crichton, A.B. Anthropology Summa Cum Laude, Harvard University (1964); M.D. Harvard Medical School (1969); Henry Russell Shaw Travelling Fellow, Harvard University (1964-1965); Visiting Lecturer in Anthropology, Cambridge University, England (1965); Post-doctoral Fellow, Salk Institute for Biological Sciences (1969-1970); Association of American Medical Writers Award (1970); Board of Trustees, Western Behavioral Sciences Institute (1986-1991); Visiting Writer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1988); Board of Overseers, Harvard University (1990-1996); George Foster Peabody Award (1994); Board of Directors, Gorilla Foundation (2002-2008); (Died: November 4, 2008)

Richard S. J. Tol, M.Sc. Econometrics, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands (1992); Ph.D. Economics (Thesis: "A decision-analytic treatise of the enhanced greenhouse effect"), Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands (1997); Researcher, Institute for Environmental Studies, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands (1992-2008); Visiting Researcher, Canadian Centre for Climate Research, University of Victoria, Canada (1994); Visiting researcher, Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment, University College London, United Kingdom (1995); Acting Programme Manager Quantitative Environmental Economics, Institute for Environmental Studies, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands (1998-1999); Visiting Associate Professor, Department of Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University (1998-2000); Board Member, Centre for Marine and Climate Research, Hamburg University (2000-2006); Lead Author, IPCC (2001, 2013); Contributing Author and Expert Reviewer, IPCC (2001, 2007, 2013); Associate Editor, Environmental and Resource Economics Journal (2001-2006); Adjunct Professor, Department of Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University (2000-2008); Michael Otto Professor of Sustainability and Global Change, Department of Geosciences and Department of Economics, Hamburg University, Germany (2000-2006); Editor, Energy Economics Journal (2003-Present); Visiting Research Scholar, Princeton Environmental Institute and Visiting Professor, Department of Economics, Princeton University (2005-2006); Research Professor, Economic and Social Research Institute, Ireland (2006-2011); Research Fellow, Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP), Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University (2007-2010); Associate Editor, Economics E-Journal (2007-Present); Adjunct Professor, Department of Economics, Trinity College, Ireland (2010-2011); Professor of the Economics of Climate Change, Institute for Environmental Studies and Department of Spatial Economics, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands (2008-Present); Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, University of Sussex, Falmer, United Kingdom (2012-Present)

Ross McKitrick, B.A. (Hons) Economics, Queen's University (1988); M.A. Economics, University of British Columbia (1990); Ph.D. Environmental Economics (Thesis: "The econometric critique of applied General Equilibrium modeling: a comparative assessment with application to carbon taxes in Canada"), University of British Columbia (1996); Research Assistant, Industrial Relations Centre, Queen's University (1988-1989); Research Assistant, University of British Columbia (1989-1996); Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Guelph (1996-2001); Associate Professor of Economics, University of Guelph (2001-2009); Professor of Environmental Economics, University of Guelph (2009-Present); Academic Advisory Board, John Deutsch Institute, Queen's University; Senior Fellow, Fraser Institute; Expert Reviewer, IPCC (2007); CBE Chair in Sustainable Commerce, University of Guelph; CME Fellow in Commerce for a Sustainable World, University of Guelph (2012); Adjunct Scholar, Center for the Study of Science, Cato Institute (2014-Present)

Sonja Boehmer-Christiansen, B.A. (Hons) Geography (Thesis: Geomorphology), University of Adelaide (1962); M.A. International Relations, University of Sussex (1971); Ph.D. International Relations (Thesis: "Limits to the International Control of Marine Pollution"), University of Sussex (1981); Lecturer in Geography, Flinders University, Australia (1963-68); Research Assistant, Institute for Public International Law, Ludwig-Maximillian University, Germany (1982-1985); Consultant, Acid Rain Project, Chatham House, UK (1986-1987); Research Fellow, Science Policy Unit, University of Sussex, UK (1985-1987); Senior Research Fellow, Science Policy Unit, University of Sussex, UK (1987-1993); Member, Working Group on Global Environmental Change, International Political Science Association (1991-1994); Referee, Environmental Research Programme, European Commission (1992); Member, Working Group on Environment and Society, International Sociological Association (1992-Present); Reader of Environmental Science and Management, Department of Geography, University of Hull, UK (1993-2007); Consultant, Climatic Impacts Centre, Macquarie University, Australia (1994); Member, International Geographical Union (1998-Present); Editor, Energy & Environment Journal (1998-Present); Reader Emeritus of Environmental Science and Management, Department of Geography, University of Hull, UK (2007-Present); Expert Reviewer, IPCC (1995, 2001)

Andrew - January 27, 2011 11:47 PM (GMT)
Astronauts:

Edwin E. (Buzz) Aldrin, B.S. Mechanical Engineering, West Point (1951); Sc.D. Astronautics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1963); Astronaut, Gemini 12, Apollo 11, NASA (1963-1971); Presidential Medal for Freedom (1969); NASA Distinguished Service Medal (1970)

"I think the climate has been changing for billions of years. If it's warming now, it may cool off later. I'm not in favour of just taking short-term isolated situations and depleting our resources to keep our climate just the way it is today. I'm not necessarily of the school that we are causing it all, I think the world is causing it." - Buzz Aldrin


Harrison H. Schmitt, B.S. Science, California Institute of Technology (1957); Ph.D. Geology, Harvard University (1964); Geologist, USGS (1957-1961); Teaching Fellow, Harvard University (1961); Project Chief, Astrogeology Center, USGS (1961-1965); Astronaut, Apollo 17, NASA (1965-1975); Johnson Space Center Superior Achievement Award (1970); Arthur S. Fleming Award (1973); NASA Distinguished Service Medal (1973); Sherman Fairchild Distinguished Scholar, California Institute of Technology (1973-1974); Chief, Scientist-Astronauts, NASA (1974); Assistant Administrator for Energy Programs, NASA (1974-1975); Fellow, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (1977); NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal (1982); Adjunct Professor of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison (1994-Present)

"I don't think the human effect is significant compared to the natural effect. Not that the planet hasn't warmed. We know it has or we'd all still be in the Ice Age but it has not reached a crisis proportion and, even among us skeptics, there's disagreement about how much man has been responsible for that warming." - Harrison Schmitt


Philip K. Chapman, B.S. Physics and Mathematics, Sydney University (1956); M.S. Aeronautics and Astronautics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1964); Sc.D. Instrumentation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1967); Physicist, Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition (1958-1959); Engineer, Canadian Aviation Electronics Limited (1960-1961); British Polar Medal (1961); Physicist, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1962-1967); Astronaut, Apollo 14 Mission Scientist, NASA (1967-1972)

"All those urging action to curb global warming need to take off the blinkers and give some thought to what we should do if we are facing global cooling instead." - Phil Chapman


Walter Cunningham, B.A. Physics with honors, University of California, Los Angeles (1960); M.A. Physics with distinction, University of California, Los Angeles (1961); Doctoral Candidate, Institute of Geophysics And Planetary Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles (1963); Advanced Management Program, Harvard Business School (1974); Physicist, RAND Corporation (1960-1963); Astronaut, Apollo 7, NASA (1963-1971); NASA Exceptional Service Medal (1968); Chief, Skylab Branch of the Astronaut Office, NASA (1968-1971); AIAA Haley Astronautics Award (1969); Associate Fellow, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Society; Member, American Geophysical Union; Member, Sigma Pi Sigma; Member, Sigma Xi; Founding Director, Earth Awareness Foundation; NASA Distinguished Service Medal (2008)

"I believe in global climate change, but there is no way that humans can influence the temperature of our planet to any measurable degree with the tools currently at their disposal. Any human contribution to global temperature change is lost in the noise of terrestrial and cosmic factors." - Walter Cunningham




Hosted for free by zIFBoards