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 Great Underrated Films, What film do U love that is underrated?
DAP
Posted: Nov 19 2005, 12:58 PM


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There are lots of underrated/unknown classic films that are really great films and seem to get overlooked. List your favorite unknown gems!

First off, the film that I love that, in my opinion, is highly underrated is 'Escape Me Never' with Errol Flynn and Ida Lupino. I think there is a great story and superb acting in this film. They struggled with a low budget in this film but I think that just adds to the magic!

Has anyone else seen this film and do you feel the same?

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Classic Movie Man
Posted: Nov 19 2005, 06:58 PM


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There are so many, a few of my personal faves which i believe haven't had the recognition they deserve :

Stella Maris (1918)
The Whispering Chorus (1918)
The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (1921)
Robin Hood (1922)
The Iron Mask (1929)
San Francisco (1936)
The Roaring Twenties (1939)
The Jolson Story (1946)
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Angel2121
Posted: Nov 19 2005, 07:25 PM


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I think that Meet John Doe, my favorite Capra film, is generally overshadowed by his more famous classics.
Also, Murnau's Phantom is a very interesting silent film with great camera shots, yet is overshadowed I think by Murnau's more famous films (which are better than Phantom, but cause it (a gem in itself) to be overlooked sometimes).
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norasta
Posted: Nov 21 2005, 01:16 AM


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Holiday, with Kate Hepburn and Cary Grant. George Cukor directed. Seems it's often left out when talking about Kate's best films.
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Tinyhippy
Posted: Nov 21 2005, 05:58 PM


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Escape Me Never is one of the few Errol Flynn films I have not seen! ani_crying.gif Did you know, though, that Errol and Ida Lupino are buried right next to each other? It wasn't at all intentional, I'm sure - that cemetery (Forest Lawn in Glendale, California) is the final resting place for many movie stars.
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DAP
Posted: Nov 22 2005, 02:28 PM


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TinyHippy -- wow, that is a real coincidence that Errol and Ida are buried next to each other. They had some of the best chemistry of any on-screen couple in 'Escape Me Never' IMO. You have to see this film! It is one of my all time favorites. I just happened to get lucky one night and it watched it one of the few times that it has ever aired on TMC.
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Tinyhippy
Posted: Nov 22 2005, 03:46 PM


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I hope TCM has the decency to air it again! ani_crying.gif
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Steve Roby
Posted: Nov 22 2005, 07:07 PM


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With the holiday season coming up, I'm probably due to watch the obvious choice: It's a Wonderful Life. But, though I haven't watched it in years, it's not underrated. A couple of good holiday movies I love but that other people rarely mention or even seem to know are The Shop Around the Corner and Remember the Night.

The Shop Around the Corner is probably pretty well known to movie buffs, at least in part because it was the inspiration for the much less enjoyable Tom Hanks/Meg Ryan film You've Got Mail. But the original is a sparkling little romantic gem, one of those movies that, when you see it for the first time, you wonder why you didn't already know about it and see it years earlier.

I first saw part of Remember the Night as a late movie many years ago. I missed the beginning and the end and didn't even catch the title. So I was glad to recognize it when I bought the movie during a burst of Stanwyckmania more than decade ago. Yep, it's Fred MacMurray and Barbara Stanwyck again, but this is a very different movie from Double Indemnity. There's comedy, romance, a hint of larceny, and a bittersweet ending -- and it all happens during the holiday season.

Movies like You've Got Mail make me think I'm not a fan of romantic comedies. Movies like these remind me that I'm a sucker for romantic comedies, but leave me wondering if anyone can do them right nowadays.
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vallo13
Posted: Nov 22 2005, 08:14 PM


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I'd have to say 1954's "Vera Cruz" with Gary Cooper and Burt Lancaster. Directed by Robert Aldrich. The story about two adventures (soldiers of fortune) in search for the next dollar down in Mexico. The scenery is great and Lancaster is at his grinning best. A great western not to be missed.
vallo
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Angel2121
Posted: Nov 22 2005, 10:33 PM


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I would like to add The Search (1948), which has Montgomery Clift, to this list. It is a wonderful film that I don't think is talked about very much anymore.
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Melly
Posted: Nov 23 2005, 02:57 AM


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Even though it is well known It's a Wonderful Life I think is underrated. It's usually only dragged up at Christmas and only the last part of the movie has to do with Christmas and even then it's in an indirect way. That and it was a flop at the box office, post World War II audiences weren't willing to except "Capracorn" anymore. sad.gif
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Niffiwan
Posted: Nov 26 2005, 06:09 AM


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I think that almost every single movie that we talk about on these forums is underrated. tongue.gif

Having said that, my pick would probably be Harold Lloyd's Why Worry? (1923). It's my favourite of his films, but many people refer to it as if it was a smaller, lesser work, or don't mention it at all.
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Angel2121
Posted: Nov 27 2005, 12:24 AM


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Another film that I think is underrated is Robert Montgomery's Ride the Pink Horse. It's a great little film noir that is very well-done, and I think is generally overlooked, which is too bad.

I also think that M. Night Shyamalan's movies (except The Sixth Sense) are all underrated. After The Sixth Sense, everyone started trashing his movies. Unbreakable and Signs are nice films in their own right, and The Village isn't really too bad, either.
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Melly
Posted: Nov 27 2005, 01:26 AM


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I didn't care much for Signs, but I loved Unbreakable. The think I thing is that people expected all his movies to be just like The Sixth Sense.

This post has been edited by Melly on Nov 27 2005, 01:27 AM
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Angel2121
Posted: Nov 28 2005, 10:23 PM


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Yeah, I think that Unbreakable is actually my favorite M. Night Shyamalan film, though it didn't do too well, coming out shortly after The Sixth Sense. I liked Signs, but it's not one of my favorites or anything, and I also somewhat enjoyed The Village. I think that The Village did badly b/c everyone expected it to be a horror film or something. I'm not saying that those two are really great films or anything, but I do think that they are underrated and generally dismissed whereas they're not nearly as bad as some people say they are.
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CherylV
Posted: Nov 29 2005, 05:11 AM


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QUOTE (norasta @ Nov 21 2005, 01:16 AM)
Holiday, with Kate Hepburn and Cary Grant. George Cukor directed. Seems it's often left out when talking about Kate's best films.

Do you mean Roman Holiday, Or is there another?
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CherylV
Posted: Nov 29 2005, 05:14 AM


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QUOTE (Melly @ Nov 23 2005, 02:57 AM)
Even though it is well known It's a Wonderful Life I think is underrated. It's usually only dragged up at Christmas and only the last part of the movie has to do with Christmas and even then it's in an indirect way. That and it was a flop at the box office, post World War II audiences weren't willing to except "Capracorn" anymore. sad.gif

I agree, it was completely underrated the generation it arrived in.
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Melly
Posted: Nov 29 2005, 06:27 AM


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QUOTE (CherylV @ Nov 29 2005, 05:11 AM)
Do you mean Roman Holiday, Or is there another?

Nope they mean Holiday (1938) Click Here there's also a 1930 version of Holiday with Ann Harding. smile.gif

The one with Kate is a wonderful movie and totally underrated. I've never seen the one with Harding.
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EMB
Posted: Nov 29 2005, 02:36 PM


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QUOTE (Melly @ Nov 22 2005, 11:57 PM)
Even though it is well known It's a Wonderful Life I think is underrated. It's usually only dragged up at Christmas and only the last part of the movie has to do with Christmas and even then it's in an indirect way. That and it was a flop at the box office, post World War II audiences weren't willing to except "Capracorn" anymore. sad.gif

While it's true Frank was guilty of "Capracorn" at times, for reasons beyond me that aspect of his work overshadows the darkness in some of his films. He may have wanted a happy ending but, in LIFE and others in his canon, he also sees with a cynical, resigned eye. Like Disney, he wasn't afraid to show the dark side of the bright side, and in LIFE we see plenty of that, how unfair and capricious life can be even to the nicest of people. Yet he also believed in redemption and God, and the possibility of grace and that love can transcend everything else. I dig Capra's best work precisely because he refuses to let his stories sink, that even when things are bad some good can come. Like Uncle Walt, he understood that not everything is sweetness and light, but unlike others, Capra was able to balance the light and the dark so very well.

ED user posted image
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CherylV
Posted: Dec 1 2005, 01:00 AM


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QUOTE (Melly @ Nov 29 2005, 06:27 AM)

Nope they mean Holiday (1938) Click Here there's also a 1930 version of Holiday with Ann Harding. smile.gif

The one with Kate is a wonderful movie and totally underrated. I've never seen the one with Harding.

Ah! I have never heard of it, therefore never seen it. Thanks for clarifying smile.gif
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markbeckuaf
Posted: Dec 1 2005, 05:26 AM


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This is yet another great topic! smile.gif

Hmmmm..underrated films. There are so many!! I'll list a few....

I'd agree with the folks who mentioned MEET JOHN DOE. I can watch that film for all seasons, and it never fails to stir me. I really love it. I'm also taken with the ending, particularly as it wasn't clear to Frank Capra how he wanted to end it. Keeping in the Capra vein, I'd also throw in THE MIRACLE WOMAN from 1931 with Barbara Stanwyck and David Manners, as well as LOST HORIZON from 1937. The latter also never fails to stir me, and I enjoy watching both JOHN DOE and HORIZON around the holiday season.

Keeping Barbara Stanwyck in mind, I enjoy NIGHT NURSE also from 1931, featuring a young Clark Gable in a vicious role!

THREE ON A MATCH is another stunning pre-code. And LILLY TURNER showcases a tour-de-force performance by the lovely Ruth Chatterton, as well as great support by Frank McHugh, Guy Kibbee, Ruth Donnelly and Robert Barrat (talk about character actor heaven!!).

Another pre-code stunner (with a very bizarre mood, as well as a stunning ending) displays an awesome performance by Dorothy Mackaill in SAFE IN HELL. Very interesting film!

In the horror vein, I'd suggest that perhaps THE OLD DARK HOUSE is underrated these days, as is DRACULA'S DAUGHTER. The latter features a fine performance by Gloria Holden in the title role, and Irving Pichel as her creepy manservant.

Pretty much anything with Warren William is underrated!!!! I'd particularly note two of his best pre-codes, where he plays a similar type of character: SKYSCRAPER SOULS and EMPLOYEES' ENTRANCE. Awesome films, but William is largely forgotten now. (NOTE: TCM US is celebrating his birthday this Friday with an all-day block of his films, including all of his appearances as PERRY MASON). ani_dancing.gif

SPECIAL AGENT from 1935 is another one I'd consider underrated, especially for a Bette Davis film, together with George Brent, and a terrific performance by Ricardo Cortez!! Another Davis film I'd consider underrated is the wonderful MARKED WOMAN!

For Bogie, I'd say his performance as the dude who gets caught up in prejudice and a hate group in BLACK LEGION is awesome!

I also think many of Edward G. Robinson's films are underrated, but I'll list just THE MAN WITH TWO FACES, THE WHOLE TOWN'S TALKING and THE LITTLE GIANT---all of them wonderful!!!

There are tons more, but that's enough for tonight for me! smile.gif

Mark
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grassharp
Posted: Dec 3 2005, 09:48 PM


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Thank you for including Robert Montgomery. He is not usually included in 'best of'.
One of my favorites is Here Comes Mr. Jordan. How good was that, way before Beatty had the idea. James Gleason was great as was Claude Ralines.
The Lux Radio Theater has a version with Cary Grant doing Montgomery's part.
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Susan Vance
Posted: Dec 4 2005, 01:13 PM


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The Lady Vanishes, I think, is greatly overshadowed by other Hitchcock early movies, namely The 39 Steps.
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grassharp
Posted: Dec 5 2005, 09:09 PM


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It is raining here, my husband is out of town so I looked through my movie collection and came up with Joel MCrea
I know my father took me to see him in westerns but among my favorite films are:
The More the Merrier
Palm Beach Story
Sullivan's Travels.

Jean Arthur and McRae we absolutely wonderful in the More the Merrier. The cute little make out scene on the front steps was mostly improvised by Joel MCrea, Charles Coburn rounded out the cast. If you have not scene this it is a little gem. His 'everyman' good lucks and 'aw shucks' speech and demeanor are ...what ...irresistable.

Great for a rainy day ...and something your cats will love too!

This post has been edited by grassharp on Dec 6 2005, 02:07 AM
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drednm
Posted: Dec 6 2005, 04:00 AM


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Well here's one to chew on..... Going Hollywood 1933....

While this musical doesn't rank with Gold Diggers of 1933 or 42nd Street or Footlight Parade or even Dames..... I think the music in this MGM film is just great. Marion Davies is gorgeous and Bing Crosby is amazing.

Davies plays a bored French teacher who heads west to meet Crosby (a radio crooner). Along the way she becomes the maid of a snotty French star (Fifi D'Orsay) who is Crosby's girlfriend. Of course Marion ends up as a dance extra (along with Patsy Kelly) in the very film Crosby is starring in with D'Orsay. And from there you can guess the rest.

Trite plot yes, but you have to remember the entire film is built on the conceit of GOING HOLLYWOOD and the very first song is set up as an answer to Marion's staring at the moon and wishing for something to happen in her life. Very clever as the film continues to build on wishes and dreams.

Crosby gets to sing a bunch of great songs, including Going Hollywood, Temptation, Our Big Love Scene, After Sundown, Beautiful Girl and We'll Make Hay While the Sun Shines.

Davies chimes in on the last number and gets to sing Have You Heard. Every time I watch this film I like it better and better. Davies is a favorite of mine, and Crosby was never better in his 30s films than he is here. His rendition of Temptation in a Mexican bar is a total knockout and reiterates the dream theme.

Also in the cast are Stu Erwin, Sterling Holloway, Ned Sparks, Clara Blandick, Nora Cecil, and the Radio Rogues.

I dare you to watch this one and not come away singing GOING HOLLYWOOD!
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