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Pages: (3) 1 2 [3]  ( Go to first unread post )

 Has Grim outed us?
Eral
Posted: Feb 4 2006, 10:37 AM


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Group: Supercoffeefragillisticexpialido
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So, does that mean you don't really hate Canada?
I bet it made the rounds of the staff-room when your son shared his South Park show-tunes. (Ahh, I love stories like that. Such events make parent/teacher interviews so much more interesting.)

Even Mother Theresa faced the odd controversy. I once heard discussion about how she only looked after the people who were definitely dying. (Not enough resources to care for the sick-but-not-dying.) If someone was lying in the street but they looked like they were not going to pop their clogs quite soon, she'd step right over them. Naturally, the people who she passed up as not sick enough were a bit annoyed by this. There was a bit of "I told you I was ill!" when she passed by and picked them up on her next circuit.


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Drew
Posted: Feb 4 2006, 04:57 PM


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True enough, but usually when you ask someone about who in the world they can't stand more than anyone else, they pick someone who's alive. smile.gif
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Bex
Posted: Feb 4 2006, 09:29 PM


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QUOTE (Drew @ Feb 3 2006, 10:50 PM)
** They originally thought it was autism. I breathed a sigh of relief when they recently concluded that he isn't autistic. (Now they're thinking CAPD which I'm glad to say is completely treatable.) Nevertheless, he still has a substantial speech delay and has some social difficulties as a result.

One of the PBG Dads has a son who has been diagnosed as autistic, or likely to be autistic, but he's said the doctors have given him and his wife hope as well. I gather that treatments for autism have progressed a lot in recent years.

What is CAPD and what are the key differences between it and autism? (I could look it up, but it means more to me coming from someone first-hand.)
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Drew
Posted: Feb 5 2006, 05:13 AM


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The only autistic trait Jacob had was that he didn't talk at all when he was 4. The doctors wrongly latched on to autism because his other developmental areas also tested behind. They failed to take into account that he didn't understand what the hell they wanted him to do. CAPD is a hearing disorder that isn't a hearing disorder. There is nothing wrong with his ears, but he has difficulty processing what he hears. Again, I must emphasize that Jacob is too young to diagnose. The only thing we know for sure is that he isn't autistic. He'll be out of special education and going to kindergarten full time next year, so he'll barely be behind.
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Eral
Posted: Feb 5 2006, 05:29 AM


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What does it stand for? We call difficulty ordering and sorting sounds auditory figure-background processing problems: it oftens occurs as temporary problem with ear infections, but some people have difficulty with it into adulthood. Most of us can screen out background sounds, and focus on immediate speech, but for children with the processing difficulty all the sounds are at the same level, sort of like having a hearing aid magnifying all the sounds within radius. The child would be unable to work out what his parent was saying to him if the TV or radio was playing. Is this the kind of thing it is?
One of the other factors that may have slowed your son's readiness to speak is perfectionism - often children with very high standards are reluctant/refuse to speak until they are sure of getting it right.
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Drew
Posted: Feb 5 2006, 06:17 AM


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Central Auditory Processing Disorder. In Jacob's case, perfectionism isn't really the case. When he was 3 and 4 years old he not only didn't speak, but didn't understand even the simplest phrases. My 2 year old son understands more than he did when he was 4. I've been fortunate enough to have access to very good special education programs for Jacob and after years of intense work (most of it one on one) Jacob is finally able to speak and understand things at about a typical 4-5 year old level. (He is almost 7) His understanding is still somewhat inconsistent. When I ask him how old he is he doesn't understand the question and no matter how many times I try to teach him he just doesn't get it. He just hit the "why" stage (anyone who has ever raised a child remembers this stage with mingled horror and bemusement) about a month ago and is moving forwards by leaps and bounds because he finally understands and speaks well enough that I can force him to use his words. He only started answering questions instead of repeating them about 6 months ago and only recently has he reached the point where I don't have to constantly reinforce it. I may sound cheery about it now, but raising Jacob has been a huge ordeal, and I'm not convinced the ordeal is over yet.
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Bex
Posted: Feb 5 2006, 08:27 AM


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I can understand. My sister has major developmental disabilities, but she'll never "catch up." Her problems stem from brain damage from oxygen deprivation at birth, and you can't really treat that, just cope with it.

Not only has raising her been hard on my parents, but it put a lot of strain on my brother and me as well, since after she was born, we were fairly well left to fend for ourselves at the tender ages of 3 and 5 (technically I was still 4 for another month).

It sounds like Jacob's prospects are bright, and I'm glad.
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Eral
Posted: Feb 5 2006, 12:14 PM


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He's doing very well then - and hopefully that gap is one that will close rapidly. I don't know that anyone raising children reaches a point where they say "Thank goodness, that's over!" - but certainly the anxiety for parents whose children experience developmental delays is hugely increased. Everyone wants their children's path to be smooth - it's very difficult to know that isn't the case for someone so important to you. It must be very satisfying to see Jacob benefiting from the efforts made to help him progress.

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